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Cow-Calf Producer Perceptions Regarding Individual Animal Traceability

Author

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  • Schulz, Lee L.
  • Tonsor, Glynn T.

Abstract

This study provides valuable insights into cow-calf producer voluntary participation in the National Animal Identification System and producers’ perceptions of several issues critically impacting the success of voluntary traceability systems. Cow-calf producers believe that the most important issues to the U.S. beef industry in designing a national, individual animal traceability system are monitoring/managing disease, maintaining current foreign markets, accessing foreign markets, and increasing consumer confidence. Furthermore, producers are concerned with cost, liability, reliability of technology, failure of system to meet stated goals, and confidentiality of information associated with these systems.

Suggested Citation

  • Schulz, Lee L. & Tonsor, Glynn T., 2010. "Cow-Calf Producer Perceptions Regarding Individual Animal Traceability," Journal of Agricultural and Applied Economics, Southern Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 42(04), November.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:joaaec:100517
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Buhr, Brian L., 2003. "Traceability, Trade And Cool: Lessons From The Eu Meat And Poultry Industry," Working Papers 14577, International Agricultural Trade Research Consortium.
    2. Golan, Elise H. & Krissoff, Barry & Kuchler, Fred & Calvin, Linda & Nelson, Kenneth E. & Price, Gregory K., 2004. "Traceability In The U.S. Food Supply: Economic Theory And Industry Studies," Agricultural Economics Reports 33939, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
    3. Bulut, Harun & Lawrence, John D., 2007. "Meat Slaughter and Processing Plants’ Traceability Levels Evidence From Iowa," 2007 Conference, April 16-17, 2007, Chicago, Illinois 37576, NCCC-134 Conference on Applied Commodity Price Analysis, Forecasting, and Market Risk Management.
    4. Murphy, Ryan G.L. & Pendell, Dustin L. & Smith, Gary C., 2009. "Lessons from the Canadian Cattle Industry for Developing the National Animal Identification System," International Food and Agribusiness Management Review, International Food and Agribusiness Management Association (IFAMA), vol. 12(2).
    5. Peter Boxall & Wiktor Adamowicz, 2002. "Understanding Heterogeneous Preferences in Random Utility Models: A Latent Class Approach," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 23(4), pages 421-446, December.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Pendell, Dustin L. & Tonsor, Glynn T. & Dhuyvetter, Kevin C. & Brester, Gary W. & Schroeder, Ted C., 2013. "Evolving beef export market access requirements for age and source verification," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 43(C), pages 332-340.
    2. Schumacher, Tucker & Schroeder, Ted C. & Tonsor, Glynn T., 2012. "Willingness-to-Pay for Calf Health Programs and Certification Agents," Journal of Agricultural and Applied Economics, Southern Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 44(02), May.
    3. Seyoum, Bruk Tefera & Adam, Brian D. & Ge, Candi, 2013. "The Value of Genetic Information in a Whole-Chain Traceability System for Beef," 2013 Annual Meeting, August 4-6, 2013, Washington, D.C. 150458, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    animal traceability; cow-calf; National Animal Identification System; voluntary adoption; Agribusiness; Community/Rural/Urban Development; Crop Production/Industries; Farm Management; Labor and Human Capital; Land Economics/Use; Livestock Production/Industries; Production Economics; Research and Development/Tech Change/Emerging Technologies; Q12; Q18; R38;

    JEL classification:

    • Q12 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Micro Analysis of Farm Firms, Farm Households, and Farm Input Markets
    • Q18 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Agricultural Policy; Food Policy
    • R38 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Real Estate Markets, Spatial Production Analysis, and Firm Location - - - Government Policy

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