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Westernization In China: A Case Study In Processed Potatoes


  • Curtis, Kynda R.
  • McCluskey, Jill J.
  • Wahl, Thomas I.


Keywords: China, potatoes, westernization, food demand, convenience foods Abstract: The demand for convenience foods is growing around the world, especially in China. However, the contributing factors of this change in food preferences are still largely unknown. To measure this westernization trend, data from a survey of Chinese consumers in Beijing is evaluated using a multinomial ordered logit model to determine which consumer attributes influence the probability of consuming western foods such as French fries, mashed potatoes, and potato chips. Results show that higher income levels and positive opinions concerning western food taste have a significant influence on increased consumption of all three processed potato products. Additionally, younger ages and female gender were highly significant indicators of increased French fry and potato chip consumption.

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  • Curtis, Kynda R. & McCluskey, Jill J. & Wahl, Thomas I., 2003. "Westernization In China: A Case Study In Processed Potatoes," 2003 Annual meeting, July 27-30, Montreal, Canada 22036, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:aaea03:22036

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    11. Grimsrud, Kristine M. & McCluskey, Jill J. & Loureiro, Maria L. & Wahl, Thomas I., 2002. "Consumer Attitudes Towards Genetically Modified Foods In Norway," 2002 Annual meeting, July 28-31, Long Beach, CA 19818, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
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