IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/ags/aareaj/117992.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Chinese animal product consumption in the 1990s

Author

Listed:
  • Ma, Hengyun
  • Rae, Allan N.
  • Huang, Jikun
  • Rozelle, Scott

Abstract

Chinese animal product consumption behaviour was analysed for both urban and rural households using a complete regional consumption dataset that was augmented to include away‐from‐home consumption. Seven animal product expenditure share equations were estimated with an extended Almost Ideal Demand System model. The results suggest that Chinese consumers will continue to increase their consumption of animal products, but that consumption patterns have changed in the 1990s. A large percentage of household animal product expenditure is still on pork. However, the shares for aquatic and poultry products consumption will increase substantially. As a consequence, the pork expenditure share will be gradually reduced as incomes grow and diet preferences change in both urban and rural households. There are significant differences in animal product consumption preferences across regions of China. As a result, studies that omit regional dummy variables in their demand systems can produce different expenditure and price parameters. The present paper also found that many of the estimates of elasticities and marginal expenditure shares would be rather different if the data ignored consumption away from home.

Suggested Citation

  • Ma, Hengyun & Rae, Allan N. & Huang, Jikun & Rozelle, Scott, 2004. "Chinese animal product consumption in the 1990s," Australian Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society, vol. 48(4), December.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:aareaj:117992
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/117992
    Download Restriction: no

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Han, Tong & Wahl, Thomas I., 1998. "China'S Rural Household Demand For Fruit And Vegetables," Journal of Agricultural and Applied Economics, Southern Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 30(01), July.
    2. Fan, Shenggen & Cramer, Gail & Wailes, Eric, 1994. "Food demand in rural China: evidence from rural household survey," Agricultural Economics, Blackwell, vol. 11(1), pages 61-69, September.
    3. Frank Fuller & Dermot Hayes & Darnell Smith, 2000. "Reconciling Chinese Meat Production and Consumption Data," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 49(1), pages 23-44.
    4. Huang, Jikun & Bouis, Howarth, 2001. "Structural changes in the demand for food in Asia: empirical evidence from Taiwan," Agricultural Economics, Blackwell, vol. 26(1), pages 57-69, October.
    5. Wang, Ji-Min & Zhou, Zhang-Yue & Yang, Jun, 2004. "How Much Animal Product do the Chinese Consume? Empirical Evidence from Household Surveys," Australasian Agribusiness Review, University of Melbourne, Melbourne School of Land and Environment, vol. 12.
    6. Rae, Allan N., 1998. "The effects of expenditure growth and urbanisation on food consumption in East Asia: a note on animal products," Agricultural Economics of Agricultural Economists, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 18(3), May.
    7. Gao, X. M. & Wailes, Eric J. & Cramer, Gail L., 1996. "Partial Rationing and Chinese Urban Household Food Demand Analysis," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 22(1), pages 43-62, February.
    8. X.M. Gao & Eric J. Wailes & Gail L. Cramer, 1996. "A Two-Stage Rural Household Demand Analysis: Microdata Evidence from Jiangsu Province, China," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 78(3), pages 604-613.
    9. Rae, Allan N., 1998. "The effects of expenditure growth and urbanisation on food consumption in East Asia: a note on animal products," Agricultural Economics, Blackwell, vol. 18(3), pages 291-299, May.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. De Zhou & Xiaohua Yu & Thomas Herzfeld, 2015. "Dynamic food demand in urban China," China Agricultural Economic Review, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 7(1), pages 27-44, February.
    2. Jing You & Katsushi S. Imai & Raghav Gaiha, 2014. "Decoding the Growth-Nutrition Nexus in China: Inequality, Uncertainty and Food Insecurity," The School of Economics Discussion Paper Series 1413, Economics, The University of Manchester.
    3. You, Jing & Imai, Katsushi S. & Gaiha, Raghav, 2016. "Declining Nutrient Intake in a Growing China: Does Household Heterogeneity Matter?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 77(C), pages 171-191.
    4. Pingali, Prabhu, 2007. "Westernization of Asian diets and the transformation of food systems: Implications for research and policy," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 32(3), pages 281-298, June.
    5. Lara Cockx & Liesbeth Colen & Joachim De Weerdt, 2017. "From Corn to Popcorn? Urbanization and Food Consumption in sub-Sahara Africa: Evidence From Rural-Urban Migrants in Tanzania," LICOS Discussion Papers 39017, LICOS - Centre for Institutions and Economic Performance, KU Leuven.
    6. Filippini, M. & Masiero, G. & Moschetti, K., 2009. "Regional consumption of antibiotics: A demand system approach," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 26(6), pages 1389-1397, November.
    7. Jing You, 2014. "Dietary change, nutrient transition and food security in fast-growing China," Chapters,in: Handbook on Food, chapter 9, pages 204-245 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    8. Junfei Bai & Thomas I. Wahl & Jill J. McCluskey, 2008. "Fluid milk consumption in urban Qingdao, China ," Australian Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society, vol. 52(2), pages 133-147, June.
    9. Liu, Hongbo & Parton, Kevin A. & Zhou, Zhang-Yue & Cox, Rod, 2009. "At-home meat consumption in China: an empirical study," Australian Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society, vol. 53(4), December.
    10. Allan Rae, 2008. "China's agriculture, smallholders and trade: driven by the livestock revolution? ," Australian Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society, vol. 52(3), pages 283-302, September.
    11. Hengsdijk, Huib & Guanghuo, Wang & Van den Berg, Marrit M. & Jiangdi, Wang & Wolf, Joost & Changhe, Lu & Roetter, Reimund P. & Van Keulen, Herman, 2007. "Poverty and biodiversity trade-offs in rural development: A case study for Pujiang county, China," Agricultural Systems, Elsevier, vol. 94(3), pages 851-861, June.
    12. Hongbo Liu & Kevin A. Parton & Zhang-Yue Zhou & Rod Cox, 2009. "At-home meat consumption in China: an empirical study ," Australian Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society, vol. 53(4), pages 485-501, October.
    13. Cao, Li†Juan & Tian, Wei†Ming & Wang, Ji†Min & Malcolm, Bill & Liu, Hong†Bo & Zhou, Zhang†Yue, 2013. "Recent Food Consumption Trends in China and Trade," Australasian Agribusiness Review, University of Melbourne, Melbourne School of Land and Environment, vol. 21.
    14. Ma, Hengyun & Oxley, Les, 2011. "Are China's energy markets cointegrated?," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 22(3), pages 398-407, September.
    15. repec:gam:jsusta:v:9:y:2017:i:10:p:1806-:d:114399 is not listed on IDEAS
    16. Lopez, Rigoberto A. & He, Xi & De Falcis, Eleonora, 2017. "What Drives China’s New Agricultural Subsidies?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 93(C), pages 279-292.
    17. Junfei Bai & Jill J. McCluskey & Hainan Wang & Shi Min, 2014. "Dietary Globalization in Chinese Breakfasts," Canadian Journal of Agricultural Economics/Revue canadienne d'agroeconomie, Canadian Agricultural Economics Society/Societe canadienne d'agroeconomie, vol. 62(3), pages 325-341, September.
    18. Dingyang Zhou & Hirotaka Matsuda & Yuji Hara & Kazuhiko Takeuchi, 2012. "Potential and observed food flows in a Chinese city: a case study of Tianjin," Agriculture and Human Values, Springer;The Agriculture, Food, & Human Values Society (AFHVS), vol. 29(4), pages 481-492, December.
    19. Rae, Allan N., 2008. "China’s agriculture, smallholders and trade: driven by the livestock revolution?," Australian Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society, vol. 52(3), September.
    20. Xiaohua Yu & David Abler, 2010. "Interactions between cigarette and alcohol consumption in rural China," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 11(2), pages 151-160, April.

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ags:aareaj:117992. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (AgEcon Search). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/aaresea.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.