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China'S Rural Household Demand For Fruit And Vegetables

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  • Han, Tong
  • Wahl, Thomas I.

Abstract

A two-stage budgeting LES-LA/AIDS system is sued to estimate rural household demand in China with special emphasis on changes in demand for fruit and vegetable commodities across different income groups. The own-price elasticity for food was found to be more elastic than that for clothing, housing, durable goods, and other items. Within the food group, price elasticities range from -1.042 to -0.019. Grain, with an expenditure elasticity of almost unity, is an important staple food for the average rural household. Vegetables are important nonstaple foods relative to fruits. Lower value vegetables are the most price elastic in the vegetable group. Fruits are more price elastic than vegetables, with grapes being the most price elastic. Different income groups share a common demand function.

Suggested Citation

  • Han, Tong & Wahl, Thomas I., 1998. "China'S Rural Household Demand For Fruit And Vegetables," Journal of Agricultural and Applied Economics, Southern Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 30(01), July.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:joaaec:15108
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Fan, Shenggen & Cramer, Gail & Wailes, Eric, 1994. "Food demand in rural China: evidence from rural household survey," Agricultural Economics, Blackwell, vol. 11(1), pages 61-69, September.
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    Cited by:

    1. Liu, Kang Ernest & Chang, Hung-Hao & Chern, Wen S., 2008. "Changes in Fruit and Vegetable Consumption over Time and across Regions in China: A Difference-in-Differences Analysis with Quantile Regression," 2008 Annual Meeting, July 27-29, 2008, Orlando, Florida 6531, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
    2. Asante, S. B. & Osei-Asare, Y. B. & Kuwornu, J. K. M., 2016. "Smallholder Maize Farmers’ Food Consumption Expenditures in Ghana: The Mediating Role of Commercialization," AGRIS on-line Papers in Economics and Informatics, Czech University of Life Sciences Prague, Faculty of Economics and Management, vol. 8(3), September.
    3. Ma, Hengyun & Huang, Jikun & Rozelle, Scott & Rae, Allan N., 2003. "Livestock Product Consumption Patterns In Urban And Rural China," China Agriculture Project Working Papers 23689, Massey University, Centre for Applied Economics and Policy Studies.
    4. Ma, Hengyun & Rae, Allan N. & Huang, Jikun & Rozelle, Scott, 2004. "Chinese animal product consumption in the 1990s," Australian Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society, vol. 48(4), December.
    5. Meng, Ting & Florkowski, Wojciech J. & Kolavalli, Shashidhara & Ibrahim, Mohammed, 2012. "Food Expenditures in Rural Households in the Northern Region of Ghana," 2012 Annual Meeting, February 4-7, 2012, Birmingham, Alabama 119716, Southern Agricultural Economics Association.
    6. Gilbert, John & Wahl, Thomas I., 2001. "China'S Accession To The Wto And Impacts On Livestock Trade And Production Patterns," International Trade in Livestock Products Symposium, January 18-19, 2001, Auckland, New Zealand 14540, International Agricultural Trade Research Consortium.
    7. Cheng Fang & Frank H. Fuller, 1998. "Feed-Grain Consumption by Traditional Pork-Producing Households in China," Center for Agricultural and Rural Development (CARD) Publications 98-wp203, Center for Agricultural and Rural Development (CARD) at Iowa State University.
    8. Cheng Fang & Frank H. Fuller, 1998. "Feed-Grain Consumption by Traditional Pork-Producing Households in China," Food and Agricultural Policy Research Institute (FAPRI) Publications 98-wp203, Food and Agricultural Policy Research Institute (FAPRI) at Iowa State University.
    9. Arnoult, Matthieu H. & Kehlbacher, Ariane & Srinivasan, C.S. & McCloy, Rachel & Tiffin, Richard, 2015. "Food Preferences Segmentation Using An Aids/Mixture Approach," 89th Annual Conference, April 13-15, 2015, Warwick University, Coventry, UK 204239, Agricultural Economics Society.
    10. Curtis, Kynda R. & McCluskey, Jill J., 2004. "Impacts of the Westernization of Food Preferences on Medical Costs in China," 2004 Conference (48th), February 11-13, 2004, Melbourne, Australia 58399, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society.
    11. Curtis, Kynda R. & McCluskey, Jill J. & Wahl, Thomas I., 2003. "Westernization In China: A Case Study In Processed Potatoes," 2003 Annual meeting, July 27-30, Montreal, Canada 22036, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
    12. Han, Tong & Wahl, Thomas I. & Mittelhammer, Ronald C., 1998. "Rural Household Fruit And Vegetable Consumption In China," 1998 Annual meeting, August 2-5, Salt Lake City, UT 20854, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
    13. Fabiosa, Jacinto F. & Jensen, Helen H. & Yan, Dong, 2005. "Household Welfare Cost of the Indonesian Macroeconomic Crisis," 2005 Annual meeting, July 24-27, Providence, RI 19311, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
    14. Meng, Ting & Florkowski, Wojciech J. & Sarpong, Daniel B. & Chinnan, Manjeet S. & Resurreccion, Anna V.A., 2014. "Consumer’s Food Shopping Choice in Ghana: Supermarket or Traditional Outlets?," International Food and Agribusiness Management Review, International Food and Agribusiness Management Association (IFAMA), vol. 17(A).
    15. Berkhout, Peter H. G. & Ferrer-i-Carbonell, Ada & Muskens, Jos C., 2004. "The ex post impact of an energy tax on household energy demand," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 26(3), pages 297-317, May.
    16. repec:pid:journl:v:55:y:2016:i:4:p:921-943 is not listed on IDEAS
    17. Meng, Ting & Florkowski, Wojciech J. & Kolavalli, Shashidhara & Ibrahim, Mohammed, 2012. "Food Expenditures and Income in Rural Households in the Northern Region of Ghana," 2012 Annual Meeting, August 12-14, 2012, Seattle, Washington 124638, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    18. Curtis, Kynda R. & McCluskey, Jill J. & Wahl, Thomas I., 2007. "Consumer preferences for western-style convenience foods in China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 18(1), pages 1-14.
    19. Kehlbacher, Ariane & Arnoult, Matthieu & Srinivasan, Chittur & McCloy, Rachel & Tiffin, Richard, 2015. "Food preference segmentation using an AIDS mixture: An application to the UK," 2015 AAEA & WAEA Joint Annual Meeting, July 26-28, San Francisco, California 205461, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association;Western Agricultural Economics Association.

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