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Hugo de Almeida Vilares

Personal Details

First Name:Hugo
Middle Name:
Last Name:de Almeida Vilares
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pvi302
[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]
https://www.hugovilares.com
+351933991931
Terminal Degree:2021 London School of Economics (LSE) (from RePEc Genealogy)

Affiliation

(60%) Centre for Economic Performance (CEP)
London School of Economics (LSE)

London, United Kingdom
http://cep.lse.ac.uk/
RePEc:edi:celseuk (more details at EDIRC)

(40%) Department of Management
London School of Economics (LSE)

London, United Kingdom
http://www.lse.ac.uk/collections/management/
RePEc:edi:dmlseuk (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Hugo Reis & Hugo de Almeida Vilares, 2022. "Who's got the power? Wage determination and its resilience in the Great Recession," CEP Discussion Papers dp1885, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
  2. John T. Addison & Pedro Portugal & Hugo Vilares, 2018. "The Sources of the Union Wage Gap: The Role of Worker, Firm, Match, and Jobtitle Heterogeneity," CESifo Working Paper Series 7392, CESifo.
  3. Addison, John T. & Portugal, Pedro & Vilares, Hugo, 2017. "Sources of the Union Wage Gap: Results from High-Dimensional Fixed Effects Regression Models," GLO Discussion Paper Series 5, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
  4. Addison, John T. & Portugal, Pedro & Vilares, Hugo, 2017. "Unions and collective bargaining in the wake of the Great Recession: evidence from Portugal," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 67962, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.

    repec:ptu:wpaper:w201512 is not listed on IDEAS
    repec:ptu:wpaper:w201506 is not listed on IDEAS

Articles

  1. John T. Addison & Pedro Portugal & Hugo Vilares, 2017. "Unions and Collective Bargaining in the Wake of the Great Recession: Evidence from Portugal," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 55(3), pages 551-576, September.

    RePEc:ptu:bdpart:e201507 is not listed on IDEAS
    RePEc:ptu:bdpart:b201411 is not listed on IDEAS
    RePEc:ptu:bdpart:b201317 is not listed on IDEAS

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. John T. Addison & Pedro Portugal & Hugo Vilares, 2018. "The Sources of the Union Wage Gap: The Role of Worker, Firm, Match, and Jobtitle Heterogeneity," CESifo Working Paper Series 7392, CESifo.

    Cited by:

    1. Marta Silva & Jose Garcia-Louzao, 2021. "Coworker Networks and the Labor Market Outcomes of Displaced Workers: Evidence from Portugal," Bank of Lithuania Working Paper Series 95, Bank of Lithuania.
    2. Pedro S. Martins, 2014. "30,000 minimum wages: the economic effects of collective bargaining extensions," Nova SBE Working Paper Series wp589, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Nova School of Business and Economics.
    3. Ray Bachan & Alex Bryson, 2021. "The Gender Wage Gap Among University Vice Chancellors in the UK," DoQSS Working Papers 21-04, Quantitative Social Science - UCL Social Research Institute, University College London.
    4. Martins, Pedro S., 2019. "The Microeconomic Impacts of Employee Representatives: Evidence from Membership Thresholds," GLO Discussion Paper Series 428, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
    5. Alessandro Sforza, 2020. "Shocks and the Organization of the Firm: Who Pays the Bill?," CESifo Working Paper Series 8084, CESifo.

  2. Addison, John T. & Portugal, Pedro & Vilares, Hugo, 2017. "Sources of the Union Wage Gap: Results from High-Dimensional Fixed Effects Regression Models," GLO Discussion Paper Series 5, Global Labor Organization (GLO).

    Cited by:

    1. Marta Silva & Jose Garcia-Louzao, 2021. "Coworker Networks and the Labor Market Outcomes of Displaced Workers: Evidence from Portugal," Bank of Lithuania Working Paper Series 95, Bank of Lithuania.
    2. Pedro S. Martins, 2014. "30,000 minimum wages: the economic effects of collective bargaining extensions," Nova SBE Working Paper Series wp589, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Nova School of Business and Economics.
    3. Ray Bachan & Alex Bryson, 2021. "The Gender Wage Gap Among University Vice Chancellors in the UK," DoQSS Working Papers 21-04, Quantitative Social Science - UCL Social Research Institute, University College London.
    4. Martins, Pedro S., 2019. "The Microeconomic Impacts of Employee Representatives: Evidence from Membership Thresholds," GLO Discussion Paper Series 428, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
    5. Alessandro Sforza, 2020. "Shocks and the Organization of the Firm: Who Pays the Bill?," CESifo Working Paper Series 8084, CESifo.

  3. Addison, John T. & Portugal, Pedro & Vilares, Hugo, 2017. "Unions and collective bargaining in the wake of the Great Recession: evidence from Portugal," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 67962, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.

    Cited by:

    1. Hartog, Joop & Raposo, Pedro, 2017. "Are starting wages reduced by an insurance premium for preventing wage decline? Testing the prediction of Harris and Holmstrom (1982)," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 48(C), pages 105-119.
    2. David Card & Ana Rute Cardoso, 2022. "Wage Flexibility under Sectoral Bargaining," Journal of the European Economic Association, European Economic Association, vol. 20(5), pages 2013-2061.
    3. Benjamin Born & Francesco D’Ascanio & Gernot J. Müller & Johannes Pfeifer, 2021. "Mr. Keynes Meets the Classics: Government Spending and the Real Exchange Rate," ifo Working Paper Series 352, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich.
    4. Denis Fougère & Erwan Gautier & Sébastien Roux, 2016. "The Impact of the National Minimum Wage on Industry-Level Wage Bargaining in France," SciencePo Working papers Main hal-01308722, HAL.
    5. Carlos Oliveira, 2022. "How is the Minimum Wage Shaping the Wage Disitribution: Bite, Spillovers, and Wage Inequality," GEE Papers 0160, Gabinete de Estratégia e Estudos, Ministério da Economia, revised May 2022.
    6. Dale-Olsen, Harald, 2019. "Creative Destruction, Social Security Uptake and Union Networks," IZA Discussion Papers 12546, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    7. Gu, Grace Weishi & Malik, Samreen & Pozzoli, Dario & Rocha, Vera, 2016. "Trade Induced Skill Upgrading: Lessons from the Danish and Portuguese Experiences," IZA Discussion Papers 10035, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    8. Getinet Astatike Haile, 2021. "Men, women and unions," Industrial Relations Journal, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 52(3), pages 201-217, May.
    9. Oliveira, Carlos, 2021. "How is the Minimum Wage Shaping the Wage Distribution: Minimum Wage, Spillovers, and Wage Inequality in Portugal," MPRA Paper 112534, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    10. Miguel à ngel García Calavia & Michael Rigby, 2020. "The extension of collective agreements in France, Portugal and Spain," Transfer: European Review of Labour and Research, , vol. 26(4), pages 399-414, November.
    11. Martins, Pedro S., 2020. "What Do Employers' Associations Do?," GLO Discussion Paper Series 496, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
    12. Alexander Hijzen & Pedro S. Martins, 2016. "No Extension without Representation? Evidence from a Natural Experiment in Collective Bargaining," IMF Working Papers 2016/143, International Monetary Fund.
    13. Addison, John T., 2015. "Collective Bargaining Systems and Macroeconomic and Microeconomic Flexibility: The Quest for Appropriate Institutional Forms in Advanced Economies," IZA Discussion Papers 9587, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    14. Martins, Pedro S. & Saraiva, Joana, 2020. "Assessing the legal value added of collective bargaining agreements," International Review of Law and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 62(C).
    15. Isabel Távora, 2019. "Collective bargaining in Portugal in the aftermath of the crisis: trends and prospects," Industrial Relations Journal, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 50(5-6), pages 548-563, November.
    16. Martins, Pedro S., 2019. "The Microeconomic Impacts of Employee Representatives: Evidence from Membership Thresholds," GLO Discussion Paper Series 428, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
    17. Boeri, Tito & Jimeno, Juan F., 2016. "Learning from the Great Divergence in unemployment in Europe during the crisis," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 41(C), pages 32-46.
    18. John T. Addison & Pedro Portugal & Hugo Vilares, 2018. "The Sources of the Union Wage Gap: The Role of Worker, Firm, Match, and Jobtitle Heterogeneity," CESifo Working Paper Series 7392, CESifo.
    19. Addison, John T. & Portugal, Pedro & Vilares, Hugo, 2017. "Sources of the Union Wage Gap: Results from High-Dimensional Fixed Effects Regression Models," GLO Discussion Paper Series 5, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
    20. Torres, Sónia & Portugal, Pedro & Addison, John T. & Guimarães, Paulo, 2018. "The sources of wage variation and the direction of assortative matching: Evidence from a three-way high-dimensional fixed effects regression model," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 54(C), pages 47-60.
    21. Hijzen, Alexander & Martins, Pedro S. & Parlevliet, Jante, 2017. "Collective Bargaining through the Magnifying Glass: A Comparison between the Netherlands and Portugal," IZA Discussion Papers 11113, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    22. D. Fougere & E. Gautier & S. Roux, 2017. "Understanding Wage Floor Setting in Industry-Level Agreements: Evidence from France," Documents de Travail de l'Insee - INSEE Working Papers g2017-01, Institut National de la Statistique et des Etudes Economiques.
    23. Geraldine Healy & M. Mostak Ahamed, 2019. "Gender Pay Gap, Voluntary Interventions and Recession: The Case of the British Financial Services Sector," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 57(2), pages 302-327, June.
    24. Addison, John T. & Portugal, Pedro & de Almeida Vilares, Hugo, 2023. "Union membership density and wages: The role of worker, firm, and job-title heterogeneity," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 233(2), pages 612-632.
    25. Guimaraes, Paulo & Martins, Fernando & Portugal, Pedro, 2017. "Upward Nominal Wage Rigidity," IZA Discussion Papers 10510, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    26. Andrew Garin & Filipe Silverio, 2017. "How Does Firm Performance Affect Wages? Evidence from Idiosyncratic Export Shocks," 2017 Papers pga940, Job Market Papers.

Articles

  1. John T. Addison & Pedro Portugal & Hugo Vilares, 2017. "Unions and Collective Bargaining in the Wake of the Great Recession: Evidence from Portugal," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 55(3), pages 551-576, September.
    See citations under working paper version above.Sorry, no citations of articles recorded.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

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Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 9 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-LTV: Unemployment, Inequality & Poverty (5) 2015-04-11 2015-06-05 2015-10-25 2017-03-12 2019-01-07. Author is listed
  2. NEP-EUR: Microeconomic European Issues (3) 2015-10-25 2017-03-12 2019-01-07. Author is listed
  3. NEP-HME: Heterodox Microeconomics (3) 2015-04-11 2015-06-05 2018-09-10. Author is listed
  4. NEP-EEC: European Economics (2) 2022-12-19 2023-03-06
  5. NEP-LAB: Labour Economics (2) 2015-04-11 2015-08-13
  6. NEP-LMA: Labor Markets - Supply, Demand, & Wages (1) 2019-01-07

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