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Shuhei Takahashi

Personal Details

First Name:Shuhei
Middle Name:
Last Name:Takahashi
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pta561
[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]
https://sites.google.com/site/shuheitakahashi/

Affiliation

Institute of Economic Research
Kyoto University

Kyoto, Japan
http://www.kier.kyoto-u.ac.jp/

: +81-75-753-7102
+81-75-753-7193
Yoshida-Honmachi, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501
RePEc:edi:iekyojp (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Tomoyuki Nakajima & Shuhei Takahashi, 2017. "The Optimum Quantity of Debt for Japan," KIER Working Papers 964, Kyoto University, Institute of Economic Research.
  2. Shuhei Takahashi & Ken Yamada, 2017. "The Impact of Taxes and Transfers on Skill Premium," KIER Working Papers 976, Kyoto University, Institute of Economic Research.
  3. Tomoyuki Nakajima & Shuhei Takahashi, 2016. "Consumption Taxes and Divisibility of Labor under Incomplete Markets," UTokyo Price Project Working Paper Series 065, University of Tokyo, Graduate School of Economics.
  4. Tomoyuki Nakajima & Shuhei Takahashi, 2016. "The Effectiveness of Consumption Taxes and Transfers as Insurance against Idiosyncratic Risk," KIER Working Papers 933, Kyoto University, Institute of Economic Research.
  5. Shuhei Takahashi, 2015. "Time-Varying Wage Risk, Incomplete Markets, and Business Cycles," KIER Working Papers 912, Kyoto University, Institute of Economic Research.
  6. Shuhei Takahashi, 2014. "State Dependency in Price and Wage Setting," UTokyo Price Project Working Paper Series 034, University of Tokyo, Graduate School of Economics.
  7. Kimie Harada & Takatoshi Ito & Shuhei Takahashi, 2010. "Is the Distance to Default a Good Measure in Predicting Bank Failures? Case Studies," NBER Working Papers 16182, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

Articles

  1. Nakajima, Tomoyuki & Takahashi, Shuhei, 2017. "The optimum quantity of debt for Japan," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 46(C), pages 17-26.
  2. Shuhei Takahashi, 2017. "State Dependency in Price and Wage Setting," International Journal of Central Banking, International Journal of Central Banking, vol. 13(1), pages 151-189, February.
  3. Shuhei Takahashi, 2014. "Heterogeneity and Aggregation: Implications for Labor-Market Fluctuations: Comment," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 104(4), pages 1446-1460, April.
  4. Harada, Kimie & Ito, Takatoshi & Takahashi, Shuhei, 2013. "Is the Distance to Default a good measure in predicting bank failures? A case study of Japanese major banks," Japan and the World Economy, Elsevier, vol. 27(C), pages 70-82.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Wikipedia mentions

(Only mentions on Wikipedia that link back to a page on a RePEc service)
  1. Shuhei Takahashi, 2014. "Heterogeneity and Aggregation: Implications for Labor-Market Fluctuations: Comment," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 104(4), pages 1446-1460, April.

    Mentioned in:

    1. Heterogeneity and Aggregation: Implications for Labor-Market Fluctuations (AER 2007) in ReplicationWiki ()
    2. Heterogeneity and Aggregation: Implications for Labor-Market Fluctuations: Comment (AER 2014) in ReplicationWiki ()

Working papers

  1. Tomoyuki Nakajima & Shuhei Takahashi, 2016. "Consumption Taxes and Divisibility of Labor under Incomplete Markets," UTokyo Price Project Working Paper Series 065, University of Tokyo, Graduate School of Economics.

    Cited by:

    1. Shuhei Takahashi & Ken Yamada, 2017. "The Impact of Taxes and Transfers on Skill Premium," KIER Working Papers 976, Kyoto University, Institute of Economic Research.

  2. Tomoyuki Nakajima & Shuhei Takahashi, 2016. "The Effectiveness of Consumption Taxes and Transfers as Insurance against Idiosyncratic Risk," KIER Working Papers 933, Kyoto University, Institute of Economic Research.

    Cited by:

    1. Nakajima, Tomoyuki & Takahashi, Shuhei, 2017. "The optimum quantity of debt for Japan," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 46(C), pages 17-26.

  3. Shuhei Takahashi, 2015. "Time-Varying Wage Risk, Incomplete Markets, and Business Cycles," KIER Working Papers 912, Kyoto University, Institute of Economic Research.

    Cited by:

    1. Tatsuro Senga, 2015. "A New Look at Uncertainty Shocks: Imperfect Information and Misallocation," Working Papers 763, Queen Mary University of London, School of Economics and Finance.
    2. Julia Thomas & Aubhik Khan, 2012. "Uncertainty Shocks in an Economy with Collateral Constraints," 2012 Meeting Papers 1075, Society for Economic Dynamics.

  4. Kimie Harada & Takatoshi Ito & Shuhei Takahashi, 2010. "Is the Distance to Default a Good Measure in Predicting Bank Failures? Case Studies," NBER Working Papers 16182, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    Cited by:

    1. Chen, Peimin & Wu, Chunchi, 2014. "Default prediction with dynamic sectoral and macroeconomic frailties," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 40(C), pages 211-226.
    2. Alistair Milne, 2013. "Distance to Default and the Financial Crisis," Discussion Paper Series 2013_03, Department of Economics, Loughborough University, revised Jun 2013.
    3. Singh, Manish K. & Gómez-Puig, Marta & Sosvilla-Rivero, Simón, 2016. "Sovereign-bank linkages: Quantifying directional intensity of risk transfers in EMU countries," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 63(C), pages 137-164.
    4. Serkan Arslanalp & Yin Liao, 2015. "Contingent Liabilities from Banks; How to Track Them?," IMF Working Papers 15/255, International Monetary Fund.
    5. Yener Altunbas & Leonardo Gambacorta & David Marques-Ibanez, 2014. "Does Monetary Policy Affect Bank Risk?," International Journal of Central Banking, International Journal of Central Banking, vol. 10(1), pages 95-136, March.
    6. Saldías, Martín, 2013. "Systemic risk analysis using forward-looking Distance-to-Default series," Journal of Financial Stability, Elsevier, vol. 9(4), pages 498-517.
    7. Manish K. Singh & Marta Gómez-Puig & Simón Sosvilla-Rivero, 2015. "“Bank risk behavior and connectedness in EMU countries”," IREA Working Papers 201517, University of Barcelona, Research Institute of Applied Economics, revised Jun 2015.
    8. Marta Gómez-Puig & Simón Sosvilla-Rivero & Manish K. Singh, 2018. "“The robustness of the sovereign-bank interconnection: Evidence from contingent claims analysis”," IREA Working Papers 201804, University of Barcelona, Research Institute of Applied Economics, revised Feb 2018.
    9. Flannery, Mark J. & Giacomini, Emanuela, 2015. "Maintaining adequate bank capital: An empirical analysis of the supervision of European banks," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 59(C), pages 236-249.
    10. Mark A. Carlson & Thomas B. King & Kurt F. Lewis, 2008. "Distress in the financial sector and economic activity," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2008-43, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    11. Martín Saldías, 2012. "Systemic risk analysis and option-based theory and information," Economic Bulletin and Financial Stability Report Articles, Banco de Portugal, Economics and Research Department.
    12. Nozawa, Yoshio, 2014. "What Drives the Cross-Section of Credit Spreads?: A Variance Decomposition Approach," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2014-62, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    13. Chia-Chien Chang & Yung -Jen Chung, 2016. "Can Basel Iii Liquidity Risk Measures Explain Taiwan Bank Failures," Proceedings of Economics and Finance Conferences 3205450, International Institute of Social and Economic Sciences.
    14. Ignacio Tirado, 2017. "Banking Crises and the Japanese Legal Framework," IMES Discussion Paper Series 17-E-02, Institute for Monetary and Economic Studies, Bank of Japan.
    15. Manish K. Singh & Marta Gómez-Puig & Simón Sosvilla-Rivero, 2014. "“Forward Looking Banking Stress in EMU Countries”," IREA Working Papers 201421, University of Barcelona, Research Institute of Applied Economics, revised Oct 2014.

Articles

  1. Shuhei Takahashi, 2014. "Heterogeneity and Aggregation: Implications for Labor-Market Fluctuations: Comment," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 104(4), pages 1446-1460, April.

    Cited by:

    1. Yongsung Chang & Sun-Bin Kim, 2014. "Heterogeneity and Aggregation: Implications for Labor-Market Fluctuations: Reply," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 104(4), pages 1461-1466, April.
    2. Shuhei Takahashi, 2015. "Time-Varying Wage Risk, Incomplete Markets, and Business Cycles," KIER Working Papers 912, Kyoto University, Institute of Economic Research.
    3. Pavol Majher, 2015. "Firm entry and exit, investment irreversibility, and business cycle dynamics," Vienna Economics Papers 1513, University of Vienna, Department of Economics.

  2. Harada, Kimie & Ito, Takatoshi & Takahashi, Shuhei, 2013. "Is the Distance to Default a good measure in predicting bank failures? A case study of Japanese major banks," Japan and the World Economy, Elsevier, vol. 27(C), pages 70-82.

    Cited by:

    1. Marta Gómez-Puig & Simón Sosvilla-Rivero & Manish K. Singh, 2015. "Sovereigns and banks in the euro area: A tale of two crises," Working Papers 15-01, Asociación Española de Economía y Finanzas Internacionales.
    2. Akhter, Selim & Daly, Kevin, 2017. "Contagion risk for Australian banks from global systemically important banks: Evidence from extreme events," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 63(C), pages 191-205.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

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Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 9 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-DGE: Dynamic General Equilibrium (10) 2015-01-09 2015-01-31 2015-04-25 2016-03-06 2016-04-16 2016-09-18 2017-03-12 2017-05-21 2017-05-28 2017-11-05. Author is listed
  2. NEP-MAC: Macroeconomics (9) 2015-01-09 2015-01-31 2015-04-25 2016-03-06 2016-04-16 2017-03-12 2017-05-21 2017-05-28 2017-09-24. Author is listed
  3. NEP-PUB: Public Finance (5) 2016-03-06 2016-04-16 2016-09-18 2017-05-21 2017-09-24. Author is listed
  4. NEP-PBE: Public Economics (3) 2016-09-18 2017-05-21 2017-09-24. Author is listed
  5. NEP-IAS: Insurance Economics (2) 2015-01-31 2017-05-21
  6. NEP-LMA: Labor Markets - Supply, Demand, & Wages (2) 2016-04-16 2017-09-24
  7. NEP-SOG: Sociology of Economics (1) 2016-09-18

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