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Paul Schaudt

Personal Details

First Name:Paul
Middle Name:
Last Name:Schaudt
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:psc759
[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]
https://paulschaudt.com
Terminal Degree: Wirtschaftswissenschaftliche Fakultät; Leibniz Universität Hannover (from RePEc Genealogy)

Affiliation

Swiss Institute for International Economics and Applied Economics Research
School of Economics and Political Science
Universität St. Gallen

Sankt Gallen, Switzerland
http://www.siaw.unisg.ch/
RePEc:edi:siasrch (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Richard Bluhm & Roland Hodler & Paul Schaudt, 2021. "Ethnofederalism and Ethnic Voting," CESifo Working Paper Series 9314, CESifo.
  2. Richard Bluhm & Christian Lessmann & Paul Schaudt, 2021. "The Political Geography of Cities," CESifo Working Paper Series 9376, CESifo.
  3. Bluhm, Richard & Hodler, Roland & Schaudt, Paul, 2021. "Local majorities: How administrative divisions shape comparative development," Economics Working Paper Series 2110, University of St. Gallen, School of Economics and Political Science.
  4. Martin Gassebner & Paul Schaudt & Melvin H. L. Wong, 2020. "Armed Groups in Conflict: Competition and Political Violence in Pakistan," CESifo Working Paper Series 8372, CESifo.
  5. Axel Dreher & Martin Gassebner & Paul Schaudt, 2017. "The Effect of Migration on Terror - Made at Home or Imported from Abroad?," CESifo Working Paper Series 6441, CESifo.
  6. Tobias Rommel & Paul Schaudt, 2016. "First Impressions: How Leader Changes Affect Bilateral Aid," CESifo Working Paper Series 6047, CESifo.
  7. Richard Bluhm & Martin Gassebner & Sarah Langlotz & Paul Schaudt, 2016. "Fueling Conflict? (De)Escalation and Bilateral Aid," CESifo Working Paper Series 6125, CESifo.

Articles

  1. Richard Bluhm & Martin Gassebner & Sarah Langlotz & Paul Schaudt, 2021. "Fueling conflict? (De)escalation and bilateral aid," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 36(2), pages 244-261, March.
  2. Axel Dreher & Martin Gassebner & Paul Schaudt, 2020. "The effect of migration on terror: Made at home or imported from abroad?," Canadian Journal of Economics/Revue canadienne d'économique, John Wiley & Sons, vol. 53(4), pages 1703-1744, November.
  3. Rommel, Tobias & Schaudt, Paul, 2020. "First impressions: How leader changes affect bilateral aid," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 185(C).

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Blog mentions

As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
  1. Axel Dreher & Martin Gassebner & Paul Schaudt, 2017. "The Effect of Migration on Terror - Made at Home or Imported from Abroad?," CESifo Working Paper Series 6441, CESifo.

    Mentioned in:

    1. Tuesday assorted links
      by Tyler Cowen in Marginal Revolution on 2017-05-02 20:56:14

Working papers

  1. Axel Dreher & Martin Gassebner & Paul Schaudt, 2017. "The Effect of Migration on Terror - Made at Home or Imported from Abroad?," CESifo Working Paper Series 6441, CESifo.

    Cited by:

    1. Böhmelt, Tobias & Bove, Vincenzo, 2017. "How Migration Policies Moderate the Diffusion of Terrorism," CAGE Online Working Paper Series 349, Competitive Advantage in the Global Economy (CAGE).
    2. Dreher, Axel & Fuchs, Andreas & Langlotz, Sarah, 2019. "The effects of foreign aid on refugee flows," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 112(C), pages 127-147.
    3. Lionel Ragot & Hillel Rapoport & Anthony Edo & Sulin Sardoschau & Andreas Steinmayr & Arthur Sweetman Sweetman, 2020. "An introduction to the economics of immigration in OECD countries," PSE-Ecole d'économie de Paris (Postprint) hal-03134977, HAL.
    4. Helbling, Marc & Meierrieks, Daniel, 2020. "Terrorism and Migration: An Overview," EconStor Open Access Articles and Book Chapters, ZBW - Leibniz Information Centre for Economics.
    5. Brodeur, Abel & Wright, Taylor, 2019. "Terrorism, Immigration and Asylum Approval," IZA Discussion Papers 12635, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    6. Forrester, Andrew C. & Powell, Benjamin & Nowrasteh, Alex & Landgrave, Michelangelo, 2019. "Do immigrants import terrorism?," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 166(C), pages 529-543.
    7. Krieger, Tim, 2020. "Migration and terrorism," Discussion Paper Series 2020-06, University of Freiburg, Wilfried Guth Endowed Chair for Constitutional Political Economy and Competition Policy.
    8. Tobias Böhmelt & Vincenzo Bove, 2020. "Does cultural proximity contain terrorism diffusion?," Journal of Peace Research, Peace Research Institute Oslo, vol. 57(2), pages 251-264, March.
    9. Tobias Böhmelt & Vincenzo Bove & Enzo Nussio, 2020. "Can Terrorism Abroad Influence Migration Attitudes at Home?," American Journal of Political Science, John Wiley & Sons, vol. 64(3), pages 437-451, July.

  2. Tobias Rommel & Paul Schaudt, 2016. "First Impressions: How Leader Changes Affect Bilateral Aid," CESifo Working Paper Series 6047, CESifo.

    Cited by:

    1. Christian Bommer & Axel Dreher & Marcello Perez-Alvarez, "undated". "Home bias in humanitarian aid: The role of regional favoritism in the allocation of international disaster relief," Courant Research Centre: Poverty, Equity and Growth - Discussion Papers 266, Courant Research Centre PEG.
    2. Fuchs, Andreas & Kaplan, Lennart & Kis-Katos, Krisztina & Schmidt, Sebastian S. & Turbanisch, Felix & Wang, Feicheng, 2020. "Mask wars: China's exports of medical goods in times of COVID-19," Center for European, Governance and Economic Development Research Discussion Papers 398, University of Goettingen, Department of Economics.
    3. Asmus, Gerda & Eichenauer, Vera & Fuchs, Andreas & Parks, Bradley, 2021. "Does India use development finance to compete with China? A subnational analysis," Kiel Working Papers 2189, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW Kiel).
    4. Victoria Kuzenkova, 2021. "Effective Development Institutions," Public administration issues, Higher School of Economics, issue 5, pages 161-175.
    5. Axel Dreher & Shu Yu, 2020. "The Alma Mater effect: Does foreign education of political leaders influence UNGA voting?," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 185(1), pages 45-64, October.

  3. Richard Bluhm & Martin Gassebner & Sarah Langlotz & Paul Schaudt, 2016. "Fueling Conflict? (De)Escalation and Bilateral Aid," CESifo Working Paper Series 6125, CESifo.

    Cited by:

    1. John Cruzatti C. & Axel Dreher & Johannes Matzat, 2020. "Chinese Aid and Health at the Country and Local Level," CESifo Working Paper Series 8352, CESifo.
    2. Dreher, Axel & Langlotz, Sarah, 2017. "Aid and growth.New evidence using an excludable instrument," Working Papers 0635, University of Heidelberg, Department of Economics.
    3. Toke Aidt & Facundo Albornoz & Esther Hauk, 2019. "Foreign influence and domestic policy: a survey," CESifo Working Paper Series 7567, CESifo.
    4. Dreher, Axel & Fuchs, Andreas & Langlotz, Sarah, 2019. "The effects of foreign aid on refugee flows," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 112(C), pages 127-147.
    5. Toke S. Aidt & Facundo Albornoz & Esther Hauk, 2021. "Foreign Influence and Domestic Policy," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 59(2), pages 426-487, June.
    6. Klaus Gründler & Tommy Krieger, 2018. "Machine Learning Indices, Political Institutions, and Economic Development," CESifo Working Paper Series 6930, CESifo.
    7. Axel Dreher & Valentin F. Lang & Sebastian Ziaja, 2017. "Foreign Aid in Areas of Limited Statehood," CESifo Working Paper Series 6340, CESifo.
    8. Gerd Müller & Andreas Freytag & Susanne Fricke & Franz Josef Radermacher & Axel Dreher & Sarah Langlotz & Werner Abelshauser & Matthias Wachter & Jennifer Howe, 2017. "Ein Marshallplan mit Afrika: Geeignetes Konzept für eine nachhaltige Entwicklung?," ifo Schnelldienst, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, vol. 70(04), pages 03-20, February.
    9. Andreas Fuchs & Hannes Öhler, 2021. "Does private aid follow the flag? An empirical analysis of humanitarian assistance," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 44(3), pages 671-705, March.
    10. M. Christian Lehmann, 2020. "Aiding refugees, aiding peace?," Journal of Public Economic Theory, Association for Public Economic Theory, vol. 22(5), pages 1687-1704, September.
    11. Adam, Antonis & Tsarsitalidou, Sofia, 2020. "The effect of international development assistance (IDA) on conflict. A fuzzy regression discontinuity approach," MPRA Paper 101841, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    12. Gehring, Kai & Langlotz, Sarah & Kienberger, Stefan, 2018. "Stimulant or depressant? Resource-related income shocks and conflict," Working Papers 0652, University of Heidelberg, Department of Economics.

Articles

  1. Richard Bluhm & Martin Gassebner & Sarah Langlotz & Paul Schaudt, 2021. "Fueling conflict? (De)escalation and bilateral aid," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 36(2), pages 244-261, March.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  2. Axel Dreher & Martin Gassebner & Paul Schaudt, 2020. "The effect of migration on terror: Made at home or imported from abroad?," Canadian Journal of Economics/Revue canadienne d'économique, John Wiley & Sons, vol. 53(4), pages 1703-1744, November.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  3. Rommel, Tobias & Schaudt, Paul, 2020. "First impressions: How leader changes affect bilateral aid," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 185(C). See citations under working paper version above.Sorry, no citations of articles recorded.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

Access and download statistics for all items

Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 11 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-DEV: Development (6) 2016-10-16 2016-10-23 2017-02-12 2017-03-05 2020-08-31 2021-10-11. Author is listed
  2. NEP-URE: Urban & Real Estate Economics (4) 2021-10-11 2021-10-25 2021-10-25 2021-11-15. Author is listed
  3. NEP-GEO: Economic Geography (2) 2021-10-25 2021-11-15
  4. NEP-INT: International Trade (2) 2017-06-04 2017-10-22
  5. NEP-MIG: Economics of Human Migration (2) 2017-06-04 2017-10-22
  6. NEP-CDM: Collective Decision-Making (1) 2021-10-11
  7. NEP-CTA: Contract Theory & Applications (1) 2017-10-22
  8. NEP-DCM: Discrete Choice Models (1) 2017-06-04
  9. NEP-GRO: Economic Growth (1) 2021-10-25
  10. NEP-HIS: Business, Economic & Financial History (1) 2021-10-25
  11. NEP-POL: Positive Political Economics (1) 2021-10-11

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