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Lucia Rizzica

Personal Details

First Name:Lucia
Middle Name:
Last Name:Rizzica
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pri317
https://sites.google.com/site/luciarizzica/
Terminal Degree:2014 Department of Economics; University College London (UCL) (from RePEc Genealogy)

Affiliation

Banca d'Italia

Roma, Italy
http://www.bancaditalia.it/

:

Via Nazionale, 91 - 00184 Roma
RePEc:edi:bdigvit (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Sauro Mocetti & Lucia Rizzica & Giacomo Roma, 2019. "Regulated occupations in Italy: extent and labor market effects," Questioni di Economia e Finanza (Occasional Papers) 495, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
  2. Litterio Mirenda & Sauro Mocetti & Lucia Rizzica, 2019. "The real effects of 'ndrangheta: firm-level evidence," Temi di discussione (Economic working papers) 1235, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
  3. Lucia Rizzica, 2018. "Raising aspirations and higher education: evidence from the UK’s Widening Participation policy," Temi di discussione (Economic working papers) 1188, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
  4. Ilaria De Angelis & Guido de Blasio & Lucia Rizzica, 2018. "On the unintended effects of public transfers: evidence from EU funding to Southern Italy," Temi di discussione (Economic working papers) 1180, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
  5. Cristina Giorgiantonio & Lucia Rizzica, 2018. "Working in the gig economy. Evidence from the Italian food delivery industry," Questioni di Economia e Finanza (Occasional Papers) 472, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
  6. Francesca Carta & Lucia Rizzica, 2016. "Female employment and pre-kindergarten: On the unintended effects of an Italian reformAbstract: We theoretically show that when mothers need to buy childcare services not only if they work but also if," Working Papers 091, "Carlo F. Dondena" Centre for Research on Social Dynamics (DONDENA), Università Commerciale Luigi Bocconi.
  7. Cristina Giorgiantonio & Tommaso Orlando & Giuliana Palumbo & Lucia Rizzica, 2016. "Incentives and selection in public employment," Questioni di Economia e Finanza (Occasional Papers) 342, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
  8. Lucia Rizzica, 2016. "Why go public? A study of the individual determinants of public sector employment choice," Questioni di Economia e Finanza (Occasional Papers) 343, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
  9. Roberta Occhilupo & Lucia Rizzica, 2016. "Incentives and evaluation of public managers in Italy," Questioni di Economia e Finanza (Occasional Papers) 310, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
  10. Lucia Rizzica & Marco Tonello, 2015. "Exposure to media and corruption perceptions," Temi di discussione (Economic working papers) 1043, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
  11. Lucia Rizzica, 2015. "The use of fixed-term contracts and the (adverse) selection of public sector workers," Temi di discussione (Economic working papers) 1041, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
  12. Francesca Carta & Lucia Rizzica, 2015. "Female employment and pre-kindergarten: on the uninteded effects of an Italian reform," Temi di discussione (Economic working papers) 1030, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
  13. Alessia Cassetta & Claudio Pauselli & Lucia Rizzica & Marco Tonello, 2014. "Exploring flows to tax havens through means of a gravity model: evidence from Italy," Questioni di Economia e Finanza (Occasional Papers) 236, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
  14. Lucia Rizzica, 2013. "Home or away? Gender differences in the effects of an expansion of tertiary education supply," Questioni di Economia e Finanza (Occasional Papers) 181, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
  15. Lucia Rizzica, "undated". "When the Cat\'s Away... The Effects of Spousal Migration on Investments on Children," Development Working Papers 361, Centro Studi Luca d'Agliano, University of Milano.

Articles

  1. Lucia Rizzica, 2020. "Raising Aspirations and Higher Education: Evidence from the United Kingdom’s Widening Participation Policy," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 38(1), pages 183-214.
  2. Carta, Francesca & Rizzica, Lucia, 2018. "Early kindergarten, maternal labor supply and children's outcomes: Evidence from Italy," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 158(C), pages 79-102.
  3. Lucia Rizzica, 2018. "When the Cat’s Away The Effects of Spousal Migration on Investments on Children," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 32(1), pages 85-108.
  4. Lucia Rizzica, 2008. "The Impact of Skilled Migration on the Sending Country: Evidence from African Medical Brain Drain," Rivista di Politica Economica, SIPI Spa, vol. 98(6), pages 195-230, November-.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Sauro Mocetti & Lucia Rizzica & Giacomo Roma, 2019. "Regulated occupations in Italy: extent and labor market effects," Questioni di Economia e Finanza (Occasional Papers) 495, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.

    Cited by:

    1. Sauro Mocetti & Giacomo Roma & Enrico Rubolino, 2018. "Knocking on parents’ doors: regulation and intergenerational mobility," Temi di discussione (Economic working papers) 1182, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.

  2. Litterio Mirenda & Sauro Mocetti & Lucia Rizzica, 2019. "The real effects of 'ndrangheta: firm-level evidence," Temi di discussione (Economic working papers) 1235, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.

    Cited by:

    1. Claire Giordano, Paloma Lopez-Garcia, 2018. "Is corruption efficiency-enhancing? A case study of the Central and Eastern European region," European Journal of Comparative Economics, Cattaneo University (LIUC), vol. 15(1), pages 119-164, June.
    2. Alfano, Maria Rosaria & Cantabene, Claudia & Silipo, Damiano Bruno, 2019. "Mafia Firms and Aftermaths," ETA: Economic Theory and Applications 294194, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei (FEEM).
    3. Calamunci, Francesca & Drago, Francesco, 2020. "The economic impact of organized crime infiltration in the legal economy: evidence from the judicial administration of organized crime firms," CEPR Discussion Papers 14326, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    4. Gianmarco Daniele & Gemma Dipoppa, 2018. "Doing Business Below the Line: Screening, Mafias and Public Funds," BAFFI CAREFIN Working Papers 1898, BAFFI CAREFIN, Centre for Applied Research on International Markets Banking Finance and Regulation, Universita' Bocconi, Milano, Italy.
    5. Cingano, Federico & Tonello, Marco, 2020. "Law enforcement, social control and organized crime. Evidence from local government dismissals in Italy," GLO Discussion Paper Series 458, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
    6. Calamunci, Francesca & Drago, Francesco, 2020. "The Economic Impact of Organized Crime Infiltration in the Legal Economy: Evidence from the Judicial Administration of Organized Crime Firms," IZA Discussion Papers 13028, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    7. Matteo Bugamelli & Francesca Lotti & Monica Amici & Emanuela Ciapanna & Fabrizio Colonna & Francesco D’Amuri & Silvia Giacomelli & Andrea Linarello & Francesco Manaresi & Giuliana Palumbo & Filippo Sc, 2018. "Productivity growth in Italy: a tale of a slow-motion change," Questioni di Economia e Finanza (Occasional Papers) 422, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.

  3. Lucia Rizzica, 2018. "Raising aspirations and higher education: evidence from the UK’s Widening Participation policy," Temi di discussione (Economic working papers) 1188, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.

    Cited by:

    1. Fabrizio Ferriani & Giovanni Veronese, 2019. "U.S. shale producers: a case of dynamic risk management?," Temi di discussione (Economic working papers) 1211, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
    2. Fan Li & Andrea Mercatanti & Taneli Mäkinen & Andrea Silvestrini, 2019. "A regression discontinuity design for categorical ordered running variables with an application to central bank purchases of corporate bonds," Temi di discussione (Economic working papers) 1213, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
    3. Anatoli Segura & Sergio Vicente, 2019. "Bank resolution and public backstop in an asymmetric banking union," Temi di discussione (Economic working papers) 1212, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.

  4. Ilaria De Angelis & Guido de Blasio & Lucia Rizzica, 2018. "On the unintended effects of public transfers: evidence from EU funding to Southern Italy," Temi di discussione (Economic working papers) 1180, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.

    Cited by:

    1. Ciani, Emanuele & David, Francesco & de Blasio, Guido, 2019. "Local responses to labor demand shocks: A Re-assessment of the case of Italy," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 75(C), pages 1-21.
    2. Giorgetti, Isabella & Picchio, Matteo, 2020. "One billion euro program for early childcare services in Italy," GLO Discussion Paper Series 459, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
    3. Giuseppe Albanese & Guglielmo Barone & Guido de Blasio, 2019. "Populist Voting and Losers’ Discontent: Does Redistribution Matter?," "Marco Fanno" Working Papers 0239, Dipartimento di Scienze Economiche "Marco Fanno".
    4. Gianmarco Daniele & Tommaso Giommoni, 2019. "Corruption under Austerity," BAFFI CAREFIN Working Papers 19131, BAFFI CAREFIN, Centre for Applied Research on International Markets Banking Finance and Regulation, Universita' Bocconi, Milano, Italy.

  5. Cristina Giorgiantonio & Tommaso Orlando & Giuliana Palumbo & Lucia Rizzica, 2016. "Incentives and selection in public employment," Questioni di Economia e Finanza (Occasional Papers) 342, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.

    Cited by:

    1. Mocetti, Sauro & Orlando, Tommaso, 2019. "Corruption, workforce selection and mismatch in the public sector," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 60(C).

  6. Lucia Rizzica, 2016. "Why go public? A study of the individual determinants of public sector employment choice," Questioni di Economia e Finanza (Occasional Papers) 343, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.

    Cited by:

    1. Mocetti, Sauro & Orlando, Tommaso, 2019. "Corruption, workforce selection and mismatch in the public sector," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 60(C).

  7. Lucia Rizzica & Marco Tonello, 2015. "Exposure to media and corruption perceptions," Temi di discussione (Economic working papers) 1043, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.

    Cited by:

    1. Jan Hunady, 2017. "Individual and institutional determinants of corruption in the EU countries: the problem of its tolerance," Economia Politica: Journal of Analytical and Institutional Economics, Springer;Fondazione Edison, vol. 34(1), pages 139-157, April.
    2. Claire Giordano, Paloma Lopez-Garcia, 2018. "Is corruption efficiency-enhancing? A case study of the Central and Eastern European region," European Journal of Comparative Economics, Cattaneo University (LIUC), vol. 15(1), pages 119-164, June.
    3. Francesco Decarolis & Cristina Giorgiantonio, 2020. "Corruption red flags in public procurement: new evidence from Italian calls for tenders," Questioni di Economia e Finanza (Occasional Papers) 544, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
    4. Arnstein Aassve & Gianmarco Daniele & Marco Le Moglie, 2018. "Never Forget the First Time: The Persistent Effects of Corruption and the Rise of Populism in Italy," BAFFI CAREFIN Working Papers 1896, BAFFI CAREFIN, Centre for Applied Research on International Markets Banking Finance and Regulation, Universita' Bocconi, Milano, Italy.
    5. Mastrorocco, Nicola & Minale, Luigi, 2018. "News media and crime perceptions: Evidence from a natural experiment," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 165(C), pages 230-255.
    6. Mocetti, Sauro & Orlando, Tommaso, 2019. "Corruption, workforce selection and mismatch in the public sector," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 60(C).
    7. Gartner, Christine & Giordano, Claire & Lopez-Garcia, Paloma & Gamberoni, Elisa, 2016. "Is corruption efficiency-enhancing? A case study of nine Central and Eastern European countries," Working Paper Series 1950, European Central Bank.
    8. Matteo Bugamelli & Francesca Lotti & Monica Amici & Emanuela Ciapanna & Fabrizio Colonna & Francesco D’Amuri & Silvia Giacomelli & Andrea Linarello & Francesco Manaresi & Giuliana Palumbo & Filippo Sc, 2018. "Productivity growth in Italy: a tale of a slow-motion change," Questioni di Economia e Finanza (Occasional Papers) 422, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
    9. Germana Corrado & Luisa Corrado & Giuseppe De Michele & Francesco Salustri, 2017. "Are Perceptions of Corruption Matching Reality? Theory and Evidence from Microdata," CEIS Research Paper 420, Tor Vergata University, CEIS, revised 14 Dec 2017.
    10. Tommaso Giommoni, 2017. "Exposition to Corruption and Political Participation: Evidence from Italian Municipalities," CESifo Working Paper Series 6645, CESifo.

  8. Lucia Rizzica, 2015. "The use of fixed-term contracts and the (adverse) selection of public sector workers," Temi di discussione (Economic working papers) 1041, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.

    Cited by:

    1. Lucia Rizzica, 2016. "Why go public? A study of the individual determinants of public sector employment choice," Questioni di Economia e Finanza (Occasional Papers) 343, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.

  9. Francesca Carta & Lucia Rizzica, 2015. "Female employment and pre-kindergarten: on the uninteded effects of an Italian reform," Temi di discussione (Economic working papers) 1030, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.

    Cited by:

    1. International Monetary Fund, 2016. "Italy; Selected Issues," IMF Staff Country Reports 16/223, International Monetary Fund.

  10. Alessia Cassetta & Claudio Pauselli & Lucia Rizzica & Marco Tonello, 2014. "Exploring flows to tax havens through means of a gravity model: evidence from Italy," Questioni di Economia e Finanza (Occasional Papers) 236, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.

    Cited by:

    1. Valentina Gullo & Pierluigi Montalbano, 2018. "Where does “dirty” money go? A gravity analysis," Working Papers 5/18, Sapienza University of Rome, DISS.
    2. Emma Galli & Ilde Rizzo & Carla Scaglioni, 2018. "Is transparency spatially determined? An empirical test for the Italian Municipalities," Working Papers 6/18, Sapienza University of Rome, DISS.

  11. Lucia Rizzica, 2013. "Home or away? Gender differences in the effects of an expansion of tertiary education supply," Questioni di Economia e Finanza (Occasional Papers) 181, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.

    Cited by:

    1. Effrosyni Adamopoulou & Giulia Martina Tanzi, 2014. "Academic performance and the Great Recession," Temi di discussione (Economic working papers) 970, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
    2. Ilaria De Angelis & Vincenzo Mariani & Roberto Torrini, 2017. "New Evidence on Interregional Mobility of Students in Tertiary Education: The Case of Italy," Politica economica, Società editrice il Mulino, issue 1, pages 73-96.

Articles

  1. Carta, Francesca & Rizzica, Lucia, 2018. "Early kindergarten, maternal labor supply and children's outcomes: Evidence from Italy," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 158(C), pages 79-102.

    Cited by:

    1. Giorgetti, Isabella & Picchio, Matteo, 2020. "One billion euro program for early childcare services in Italy," GLO Discussion Paper Series 459, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
    2. López Bóo, Florencia & Hojman, Andrés, 2020. "Cost-Effective Public Daycare in a Low-Income Economy Benefits Children and Mothers," IDB Publications (Working Papers) 9786, Inter-American Development Bank.
    3. Luca Corazzini & Elena Meschi & Caterina Pavese, 2019. "Impact of Early Childcare on Immigrant Children’s Educational Performance," Working Papers 2019: 24, Department of Economics, University of Venice "Ca' Foscari".
    4. Daniela Del Boca & Enrica Maria Martino & Elena Claudia Meroni & Daniela Piazzalunga, 2019. "Early Education and Gender Differences," CHILD Working Papers Series 70 JEL Classification: J1, Centre for Household, Income, Labour and Demographic Economics (CHILD) - CCA.
    5. Gangl, Selina & Huber, Martin, 2019. "From housewives to employees? How mandatory kindergarten affects mothers' labour supply in Switzerland," Annual Conference 2019 (Leipzig): 30 Years after the Fall of the Berlin Wall - Democracy and Market Economy 203636, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    6. Daniel Kuehnle & Michael Oberfichtner, 2020. "Does Starting Universal Childcare Earlier Influence Children’s Skill Development?," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 57(1), pages 61-98, February.
    7. Louis-Philippe Beland & Abel Brodeur & Derek Mikola & Taylor Wright, 2020. "COVID-19, Occupation Tasks and Mental Health in Canada," Carleton Economic Papers 20-07, Carleton University, Department of Economics, revised 30 Jun 2020.
    8. Collischon, Matthias & Kühnle, Daniel & Oberfichtner, Michael, 2020. "Cash-For-Care, or Caring for Cash? The Effects of a Home Care Subsidy on Maternal Employment, Childcare Choices, and Children's Development," IZA Discussion Papers 13271, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    9. Zelda Brutti & Daniel Montolio, 2019. "Preventing criminal minds: early education access and adult offending behavior," Working Papers 2019/02, Institut d'Economia de Barcelona (IEB).
    10. Huebener, Mathias & Pape, Astrid & Spiess, C. Katharina, 2019. "Parental Labour Supply Responses to the Abolition of Day Care Fees," IZA Discussion Papers 12780, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    11. Eckhoff Andresen, Martin & Havnes, Tarjei, 2019. "Child care, parental labor supply and tax revenue," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 61(C).
    12. Francesca Carta, 2019. "Female labour supply in Italy: the role of parental leave and child care policies," Questioni di Economia e Finanza (Occasional Papers) 539, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
    13. Nicola Bianchi & Michela Giorcelli & Enrica Maria Martino, 2019. "The Effects of Fiscal Decentralization on Publicly Provided Services and Labor Markets," CHILD Working Papers Series 71 JEL Classification: H7, Centre for Household, Income, Labour and Demographic Economics (CHILD) - CCA.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

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Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 14 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-EUR: Microeconomic European Issues (7) 2014-11-07 2015-10-10 2015-12-08 2016-07-30 2018-07-16 2018-10-29 2019-01-14. Author is listed
  2. NEP-HRM: Human Capital & Human Resource Management (4) 2013-10-02 2015-12-08 2016-03-23 2016-07-30
  3. NEP-LAW: Law & Economics (4) 2015-12-08 2016-07-30 2019-05-13 2019-12-02
  4. NEP-DEM: Demographic Economics (3) 2013-10-02 2014-01-24 2015-10-10
  5. NEP-EDU: Education (3) 2013-10-02 2016-07-30 2018-10-29
  6. NEP-LAB: Labour Economics (2) 2015-10-10 2016-07-30
  7. NEP-LMA: Labor Markets - Supply, Demand, & Wages (2) 2015-12-08 2019-05-13
  8. NEP-URE: Urban & Real Estate Economics (2) 2013-10-02 2015-12-08
  9. NEP-BEC: Business Economics (1) 2019-12-02
  10. NEP-INT: International Trade (1) 2014-01-24
  11. NEP-MIG: Economics of Human Migration (1) 2014-01-24
  12. NEP-PAY: Payment Systems & Financial Technology (1) 2019-01-14
  13. NEP-POL: Positive Political Economics (1) 2015-12-08
  14. NEP-REG: Regulation (1) 2019-05-13
  15. NEP-SEA: South East Asia (1) 2014-01-24

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