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Suphanit Piyapromdee

Personal Details

First Name:Suphanit
Middle Name:
Last Name:Piyapromdee
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:ppi341

Affiliation

Department of Economics
University College London (UCL)

London, United Kingdom
http://www.ucl.ac.uk/economics/

:

Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT
RePEc:edi:deucluk (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Suphanit Piyapromdee, 2017. "The Impact of Immigration on Wages, Internal Migration and Welfare," PIER Discussion Papers 69, Puey Ungphakorn Institute for Economic Research, revised Sep 2017.
  2. Lindsay Jacobs & Suphanit Piyapromdee, 2016. "Labor Force Transitions at Older Ages : Burnout, Recovery, and Reverse Retirement," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2016-053, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
  3. Suphanit Piyapromdee & Jean Marc Robin & Rasmus Lentz, 2016. "The Anatomy of the Wage Distribution: How do Gender and Immigration Matter?," 2016 Meeting Papers 1686, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  4. Suphanit Piyapromdee & Russell Hillberry & Donald MacLaren, 2008. "'Fair Trade' Coffee and the Mitigation of Local Oligopsony Power," Department of Economics - Working Papers Series 1057, The University of Melbourne.

Articles

  1. Suphanit Piyapromdee & Russell Hillberry & Donald MacLaren, 2014. "‘Fair trade’ coffee and the mitigation of local oligopsony power," European Review of Agricultural Economics, Foundation for the European Review of Agricultural Economics, vol. 41(4), pages 537-559.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Suphanit Piyapromdee, 2017. "The Impact of Immigration on Wages, Internal Migration and Welfare," PIER Discussion Papers 69, Puey Ungphakorn Institute for Economic Research, revised Sep 2017.

    Cited by:

    1. Dustmann, Christian & Schönberg, Uta & Stuhler, Jan, 2016. "Labor Supply Shocks, Native Wages, and the Adjustment of Local Employment," CEPR Discussion Papers 11436, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    2. Dustmann, Christian & Görlach, Joseph-Simon, 2015. "The Economics of Temporary Migrations," CEPR Discussion Papers 10371, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    3. Florian Oswald, 2015. "Regional Shocks, Migration and Homeownership," Sciences Po publications info:hdl:2441/n1d9kd7k48k, Sciences Po.
    4. Florian Oswald, 2015. "Regional Shocks, Migration and Homeownership," 2015 Meeting Papers 759, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    5. Jaeger, David A. & Ruist, Joakim & Stuhler, Jan, 2018. "Shift-Share Instruments and the Impact of Immigration," IZA Discussion Papers 11307, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    6. John Kennan, 2014. "Freedom of movement for workers," IZA World of Labor, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA), pages 1-86, September.
    7. Colas, Mark & Hutchinson, Kevin, 2017. "Heterogeneous Workers and Federal Income Taxes in a Spatial Equilibrium," Working Papers 3, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis, Opportunity and Inclusive Growth Institute.
    8. Ariel Burstein & Gordon Hanson & Lin Tian & Jonathan Vogel, 2017. "Tradability and the Labor-Market Impact of Immigration: Theory and Evidence from the U.S," NBER Working Papers 23330, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    9. Christian Dustmann & Uta Schönberg & Jan Stuhler, 2016. "The Impact of Immigration: Why Do Studies Reach Such Different Results?," CReAM Discussion Paper Series 1626, Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), Department of Economics, University College London.
    10. Albert, Christoph & Monras, Joan, 2017. "Immigrants' Residential Choices and Their Consequences," IZA Discussion Papers 11075, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

  2. Lindsay Jacobs & Suphanit Piyapromdee, 2016. "Labor Force Transitions at Older Ages : Burnout, Recovery, and Reverse Retirement," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2016-053, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).

    Cited by:

    1. John Ameriks & Joseph S. Briggs & Andrew Caplin & Minjoon Lee & Matthew D. Shapiro & Christopher Tonetti, 2017. "Older Americans Would Work Longer If Jobs Were Flexible," NBER Working Papers 24008, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

  3. Suphanit Piyapromdee & Russell Hillberry & Donald MacLaren, 2008. "'Fair Trade' Coffee and the Mitigation of Local Oligopsony Power," Department of Economics - Working Papers Series 1057, The University of Melbourne.

    Cited by:

    1. Kopp, Thomas & Bümmer, Bernhard, 2015. "Moving rubber to a better place - and extracting rents from credit constrained farmers along the way," EFForTS Discussion Paper Series 9, University of Goettingen, Collaborative Research Centre 990 "EFForTS, Ecological and Socioeconomic Functions of Tropical Lowland Rainforest Transformation Systems (Sumatra, Indonesia)".
    2. Podhorsky, Andrea, 2015. "A positive analysis of Fairtrade certification," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 116(C), pages 169-185.
    3. Mujawamariya, Gaudiose & Burger, Kees & D'Haese, Marijke F.C., 2012. "Behaviour and performance of traders in the gum arabic supply chain in Senegal: Investigating oligopsonistic myths," 2012 Conference, August 18-24, 2012, Foz do Iguacu, Brazil 126236, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    4. Kopp, Thomas & Brummer, Bernhard, 2015. "Traders and Credit Constrained Farmers: Market Power along Indonesian Rubber Value Chains," 2015 Conference, August 9-14, 2015, Milan, Italy 212012, International Association of Agricultural Economists.

Articles

  1. Suphanit Piyapromdee & Russell Hillberry & Donald MacLaren, 2014. "‘Fair trade’ coffee and the mitigation of local oligopsony power," European Review of Agricultural Economics, Foundation for the European Review of Agricultural Economics, vol. 41(4), pages 537-559.
    See citations under working paper version above.Sorry, no citations of articles recorded.

More information

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Statistics

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Co-authorship network on CollEc

Featured entries

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  1. Thai Economists

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 3 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-AGE: Economics of Ageing (1) 2016-07-16
  2. NEP-GEN: Gender (1) 2016-12-18
  3. NEP-GER: German Papers (1) 2016-07-16
  4. NEP-LTV: Unemployment, Inequality & Poverty (1) 2016-12-18
  5. NEP-MIG: Economics of Human Migration (1) 2016-12-18

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