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Jeroen Nieboer

Personal Details

First Name:Jeroen
Middle Name:
Last Name:Nieboer
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pni277
[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]
http://www.nieboer.org
Terminal Degree:2013 Centre for Decision Research and Experimental Economics (CeDEx); School of Economics; University of Nottingham (from RePEc Genealogy)

Affiliation

(50%) Centre for Decision Research and Experimental Economics (CeDEx)
School of Economics
University of Nottingham

Nottingham, United Kingdom
http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/economics/cedex/
RePEc:edi:cdnotuk (more details at EDIRC)

(50%) London School of Economics (LSE)

London, United Kingdom
http://www.lse.ac.uk/
RePEc:edi:lsepsuk (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Spiros Bougheas & Jeroen Nieboer & Martin Sefton, 2015. "Risk Taking and Information Aggregation in Groups," Discussion Papers 2015-07, The Centre for Decision Research and Experimental Economics, School of Economics, University of Nottingham.
  2. Galizzi, Matteo M. & Nieboer, Jeroen, 2015. "Digit ratio (2D:4D) and altruism: evidence from a large, multi-ethnic sample," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 60982, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  3. Pablo Brañas-Garza & Matteo M. Galizzi & Jeroen Nieboer, 2014. "Digit ratio and risk taking: Evidence from a large, multi-ethnic sample," Working Papers 14-23, Chapman University, Economic Science Institute.
  4. Spiros Bougheas & Jeroen Nieboer & Martin Sefton, 2013. "Risk Taking in Social Settings: Group and Peer Effects," Discussion Papers 2013-01, The Centre for Decision Research and Experimental Economics, School of Economics, University of Nottingham.
  5. Jeroen Nieboer, 2013. "Risk taking in diverse groups: Gender matters," Discussion Papers 2013-06, The Centre for Decision Research and Experimental Economics, School of Economics, University of Nottingham.

Articles

  1. Nieboer, Jeroen, 2015. "Group member characteristics and risk taking by consensus," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 57(C), pages 81-88.
  2. Bougheas, Spiros & Nieboer, Jeroen & Sefton, Martin, 2015. "Risk taking and information aggregation in groups," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 51(C), pages 34-47.
  3. Bougheas, Spiros & Nieboer, Jeroen & Sefton, Martin, 2013. "Risk-taking in social settings: Group and peer effects," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 92(C), pages 273-283.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Spiros Bougheas & Jeroen Nieboer & Martin Sefton, 2015. "Risk Taking and Information Aggregation in Groups," Discussion Papers 2015-07, The Centre for Decision Research and Experimental Economics, School of Economics, University of Nottingham.

    Cited by:

    1. Stephan Jagau & Theo (T.J.S.) Offerman, 2017. "Defaults, Normative Anchors and the Occurrence of Risky and Cautious Shifts," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 17-083/I, Tinbergen Institute.
    2. Marcel Fafchamps & Di Mo, 2018. "Peer effects in computer assisted learning: evidence from a randomized experiment," Experimental Economics, Springer;Economic Science Association, vol. 21(2), pages 355-382, June.

  2. Galizzi, Matteo M. & Nieboer, Jeroen, 2015. "Digit ratio (2D:4D) and altruism: evidence from a large, multi-ethnic sample," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 60982, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.

    Cited by:

    1. Cecchi, Francesco & Duchoslav, Jan, 2018. "The effect of prenatal stress on cooperation: Evidence from violent conflict in Uganda," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 101(C), pages 35-56.
    2. Parslow, Elle & Ranehill, Eva & Zethraeus, Niklas & Blomberg, Liselott & von Schoultz, Bo & Lindén Hirschberg, Angelica & Johannesson, Magnus & Dreber, Anna, 2019. "The digit ratio (2D:4D) and economic preferences: no robust associations in a sample of 330 women," Working Papers in Economics 750, University of Gothenburg, Department of Economics.
    3. Levent Neyse & Ferdinand M. Vieider & Patrick Ring & Catharina Probst & Christian Kaernbach & Thilo Eimeren & Ulrich Schmidt, 2020. "Risk attitudes and digit ratio (2D:4D): Evidence from prospect theory," Journal of Risk and Uncertainty, Springer, vol. 60(1), pages 29-51, February.
    4. Brañas-Garza, Pablo & Chowdhury, Subhasish M. & Espín, Antonio M. & Nieboer, Jeroen, 2023. "‘Born this Way’? Prenatal exposure to testosterone may determine behavior in competition and conflict," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 96(C).
    5. Brañas-Garza, Pablo & Espín, Antonio M. & Garcia, Teresa & Kovářík, Jaromír, 2018. "Digit ratio (2D:4D) predicts pro-social behavior in economic games only for unsatisfied individuals," MPRA Paper 86166, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. Neyse, Levent & Bosworth, Steven & Ring, Patrick & Schmidt, Ulrich, 2016. "Overconfidence, Incentives and Digit Ratio," Open Access Publications from Kiel Institute for the World Economy 130145, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW Kiel).
    7. Neyse, Levent & Johannesson, Magnus & Dreber, Anna, 2021. "2D:4D does not predict economic preferences: Evidence from a large, representative sample," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 185(C), pages 390-401.
    8. Neyse, Levent & Ring, Patrick & Bosworth, Steven, 2015. "Prenatal testosterone exposure predicts mindfulness: Does this mediate its effect on happiness?," Kiel Working Papers 1999, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW Kiel).
    9. Ozan Yüksel Tektas & Lorenz Kapsner & Miriam Lemmer & Polyxeni Bouna-Pyrrou & Piotr Lewczuk & Bernd Lenz & Johannes Kornhuber, 2019. "Digit ratio (2D:4D) and academic success as measured by achievement in the academic degree “Habilitation”," PLOS ONE, Public Library of Science, vol. 14(2), pages 1-16, February.
    10. Hand, Chris, 2020. "Biology and being green: The effect of prenatal testosterone exposure on pro-environmental consumption behaviour," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 120(C), pages 619-626.

  3. Pablo Brañas-Garza & Matteo M. Galizzi & Jeroen Nieboer, 2014. "Digit ratio and risk taking: Evidence from a large, multi-ethnic sample," Working Papers 14-23, Chapman University, Economic Science Institute.

    Cited by:

    1. Parslow, Elle & Ranehill, Eva & Zethraeus, Niklas & Blomberg, Liselott & von Schoultz, Bo & Lindén Hirschberg, Angelica & Johannesson, Magnus & Dreber, Anna, 2019. "The digit ratio (2D:4D) and economic preferences: no robust associations in a sample of 330 women," Working Papers in Economics 750, University of Gothenburg, Department of Economics.
    2. Brañas-Garza, Pablo & Chowdhury, Subhasish M. & Espín, Antonio M. & Nieboer, Jeroen, 2023. "‘Born this Way’? Prenatal exposure to testosterone may determine behavior in competition and conflict," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 96(C).
    3. Diaz, Lina & Houser, Daniel & Ifcher, John & Zarghamee, Homa, 2021. "Estimating Social Preferences Using Stated Satisfaction: Novel Support for Inequity Aversion," IZA Discussion Papers 14347, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    4. Judit Alonso & Roberto Di Paolo & Giovanni Ponti & Marcello Sartarelli, 2017. "Some (Mis)facts about 2D:4D, Preferences and Personality," Working Papers. Serie AD 2017-08, Instituto Valenciano de Investigaciones Económicas, S.A. (Ivie).
    5. Neyse, Levent & Johannesson, Magnus & Dreber, Anna, 2021. "2D:4D does not predict economic preferences: Evidence from a large, representative sample," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 185(C), pages 390-401.
    6. Hubert János Kiss & Alfonso Rosa-Garcia & Vita Zhukova, 2023. "Group contest in a coopetitive setup: experimental evidence," Journal of Economic Interaction and Coordination, Springer;Society for Economic Science with Heterogeneous Interacting Agents, vol. 18(3), pages 463-490, July.
    7. Sergio Da Silva & Bruno Moreira & Newton Da Costa Jr, 2015. "Handedness and digit ratio predict overconfidence in cognitive and motor skill tasks in a sample of preschoolers," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 35(2), pages 1087-1097.
    8. Thomas Meissner & Xavier Gassmann & Corinne Faure & Joachim Schleich, 2023. "Individual characteristics associated with risk and time preferences: A multi country representative survey," Journal of Risk and Uncertainty, Springer, vol. 66(1), pages 77-107, February.
    9. Hubert J. Kiss & Alfonso Rosa-Garcia & Vita Zhukova, 2019. "Coopetition in group contest," CERS-IE WORKING PAPERS 1911, Institute of Economics, Centre for Economic and Regional Studies.
    10. Finley, Brian & Kalwij, Adriaan & Kapteyn, Arie, 2022. "Born to be wild: Second-to-fourth digit length ratio and risk preferences," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 47(C).
    11. Espín, Antonio M. & Brañas-Garza, Pablo & Gamella, Juan & Herrmann, Benedikt & Martin, Jesus, 2019. "Bringing together “old” and “new” ways of solving social dilemmas? The case of Spanish Gitanos," MPRA Paper 95423, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    12. Antonio M. Espin & Valerio Capraro & Brice Corgnet & Simon Gachter & Roberto Hernan-Gonzalez & Praveen Kujal & Stephen Rassenti, 2021. "Differences in Cognitive Reflection Mediate Gender Differences in Social Preferences," Working Papers 21-22, Chapman University, Economic Science Institute.
    13. Anwesha Bandyopadhyay & Lutfunnahar Begum & Philip J. Grossman, 2021. "Gender differences in the stability of risk attitudes," Journal of Risk and Uncertainty, Springer, vol. 63(2), pages 169-201, October.
    14. Schipper, Burkhard C., 2023. "Sex hormones and choice under risk," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 96(C).
    15. Taylor, Matthew P., 2020. "Heterogeneous motivation and cognitive ability in the lab," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 85(C).

  4. Spiros Bougheas & Jeroen Nieboer & Martin Sefton, 2013. "Risk Taking in Social Settings: Group and Peer Effects," Discussion Papers 2013-01, The Centre for Decision Research and Experimental Economics, School of Economics, University of Nottingham.

    Cited by:

    1. Douwere Grekou & Jenny Watt & Horatio M. Morgan, 2023. "Gender productivity gap: does gender-equal ownership compensate for female entrepreneurs’ lack of prior industry experience?," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 60(4), pages 1543-1571, April.
    2. Stephan Jagau & Theo (T.J.S.) Offerman, 2017. "Defaults, Normative Anchors and the Occurrence of Risky and Cautious Shifts," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 17-083/I, Tinbergen Institute.
    3. Timo Heinrich & Thomas Mayrhofer, 2018. "Higher-order risk preferences in social settings," Experimental Economics, Springer;Economic Science Association, vol. 21(2), pages 434-456, June.
    4. Amadou Boly & Robert Gillanders & Topi Miettinen, 2016. "Deterrence, peer effect, and legitimacy in anti-corruption policy-making: An experimental analysis," WIDER Working Paper Series wp-2016-137, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    5. Mitton, Todd & Vorkink, Keith & Wright, Ian, 2018. "Neighborhood effects on speculative behavior," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 151(C), pages 42-61.
    6. Maria Montero & Jesal Sheth, 2019. "Naivety about hidden information: An experimental investigation," Discussion Papers 2019-11, The Centre for Decision Research and Experimental Economics, School of Economics, University of Nottingham.
    7. Ahsanuzzaman, & Priyo, Asad Karim Khan & Nuzhat, Kanti Ananta, 2022. "Effects of communication, group selection, and social learning on risk and ambiguity attitudes: Experimental evidence from Bangladesh," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 96(C).
    8. Harald W. Lang, 2016. "You Are Not Alone: Experimental Evidence on Risk Taking When Social Comparisons Matter," Working Papers tax-mpg-rps-2016-12, Max Planck Institute for Tax Law and Public Finance.
    9. Huang, Lingbo & Xiao, Erte, 2021. "Peer effects in public support for Pigouvian taxation," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 187(C), pages 192-204.
    10. Thrane, Christer & Haugom, Erik, 2020. "Peer effects on restaurant tipping in Norway: An experimental approach," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 176(C), pages 244-252.
    11. Felix Bolduan & Ivo Schedlinsky & Friedrich Sommer, 2021. "The influence of compensation interdependence on risk-taking: the role of mutual monitoring," Journal of Business Economics, Springer, vol. 91(8), pages 1125-1148, October.
    12. Spiros Bougheas & Jeroen Nieboerr & Martin Sefton, 2014. "Risk Taking and Information Aggregation in Groups," Discussion Papers 2014-09, The Centre for Decision Research and Experimental Economics, School of Economics, University of Nottingham.
    13. Konstantinos Georgalos & John Hey, 2020. "Testing for the emergence of spontaneous order," Experimental Economics, Springer;Economic Science Association, vol. 23(3), pages 912-932, September.
    14. Aimone, Jason A. & Pan, Xiaofei, 2020. "Blameable and imperfect: A study of risk-taking and accountability," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 172(C), pages 196-216.
    15. Rianne Duinen & Tatiana Filatova & Wander Jager & Anne Veen, 2016. "Going beyond perfect rationality: drought risk, economic choices and the influence of social networks," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 57(2), pages 335-369, November.
    16. Elif Aysimi Duman, 2020. "Individual Differences in Risk-Taking Preference of Undergraduate Students," Bogazici Journal, Review of Social, Economic and Administrative Studies, Bogazici University, Department of Economics, vol. 34(2), pages 177-192.
    17. Delfino, Alexia & Marengo, Luigi & Ploner, Matteo, 2016. "I did it your way. An experimental investigation of peer effects in investment choices," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 54(C), pages 113-123.
    18. Yoshio Kamijo & Teruyuki Tamura, 2019. "Risk-averse and self-interested shifts in groups in both median and random rules," Working Papers SDES-2019-3, Kochi University of Technology, School of Economics and Management, revised Apr 2019.
    19. Matthaei, Eva Kristina & Kiesewetter, Dirk, 2020. "A problem shared is a problem halved? Risky tax avoidance decisions and intra-group payoff conflict," arqus Discussion Papers in Quantitative Tax Research 258, arqus - Arbeitskreis Quantitative Steuerlehre.
    20. Enrica Carbone & Konstantinos Georgalos & Gerardo Infante, 2019. "Individual vs. group decision-making: an experiment on dynamic choice under risk and ambiguity," Theory and Decision, Springer, vol. 87(1), pages 87-122, July.
    21. Kamei, Kenju & Tabero, Katy, 2021. "The Individual-Team Discontinuity Effect on Institutional Choices: Experimental Evidence in Voluntary Public Goods Provision," MPRA Paper 112106, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    22. Grohmann, Antonia & Sakha, Sahra, 2019. "The effect of peer observation on consumption choices: evidence from a lab-in-field experiment," EconStor Open Access Articles and Book Chapters, ZBW - Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, vol. 51(55), pages 5937-5951.
    23. Nieboer, Jeroen, 2015. "Group member characteristics and risk taking by consensus," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 57(C), pages 81-88.
    24. Simon Gaechter & Lingbo Huang & Martin Sefton, 2017. "Disappointment Aversion and Social Comparisons in a Real-Effort Competition," Discussion Papers 2017-07, The Centre for Decision Research and Experimental Economics, School of Economics, University of Nottingham.
    25. Hidalgo-Hidalgo, Marisa & Jiménez, Natalia & López-Pintado, Dunia, 2021. "Social influence and position effects," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 182(C), pages 113-131.
    26. Francesca Gioia, 2017. "Peer effects on risk behaviour: the importance of group identity," Experimental Economics, Springer;Economic Science Association, vol. 20(1), pages 100-129, March.
    27. Karakostas, Alexandros & Zizzo, Daniel John, 2016. "Compliance and the power of authority," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 124(C), pages 67-80.
    28. Ambler, Kate & Godlonton, Susan & Recalde, María P., 2021. "Follow the leader? A field experiment on social influence," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 188(C), pages 1280-1297.
    29. Hsu, Yuan-Teng & Huang, Chia-Wei & Koedijk, Kees G., 2023. "Unintended consequences of compensation peer groups on corporate innovation," Journal of Corporate Finance, Elsevier, vol. 78(C).
    30. Hohnisch, M. & Pittnauer, S. & Selten, R. & Pfingsten, A. & Eraßmy, J., 2014. "Gender differences in decisions under profound uncertainty are non-robust to the availability of information on equally informed others’ decisions," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 108(C), pages 40-58.
    31. Gee, Laura Katherine, 2016. "The More You Know: Information Effects on Job Application Rates in a Large Field Experiment," IZA Discussion Papers 10372, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    32. Francesca Gioia, 2019. "Incentive schemes and peer effects on risk behaviour: an experiment," Theory and Decision, Springer, vol. 87(4), pages 473-495, November.
    33. Jeroen Nieboer, 2013. "Risk taking in diverse groups: Gender matters," Discussion Papers 2013-06, The Centre for Decision Research and Experimental Economics, School of Economics, University of Nottingham.
    34. Natalia Candelo & Rachel T. A. Croson & Catherine Eckel, 2018. "Transmission of information within transnational social networks: a field experiment," Experimental Economics, Springer;Economic Science Association, vol. 21(4), pages 905-923, December.
    35. Ahsanuzzaman, & Palm-Forster, Leah H. & Suter, Jordan F., 2022. "Experimental evidence of common pool resource use in the presence of uncertainty," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 194(C), pages 139-160.

  5. Jeroen Nieboer, 2013. "Risk taking in diverse groups: Gender matters," Discussion Papers 2013-06, The Centre for Decision Research and Experimental Economics, School of Economics, University of Nottingham.

    Cited by:

    1. Spiros Bougheas & Jeroen Nieboerr & Martin Sefton, 2014. "Risk Taking and Information Aggregation in Groups," Discussion Papers 2014-09, The Centre for Decision Research and Experimental Economics, School of Economics, University of Nottingham.

Articles

  1. Nieboer, Jeroen, 2015. "Group member characteristics and risk taking by consensus," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 57(C), pages 81-88.

    Cited by:

    1. Ertac, Seda & Gumren, Mert & Gurdal, Mehmet Y., 2020. "Demand for decision autonomy and the desire to avoid responsibility in risky environments: Experimental evidence," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 77(C).
    2. Sah, Nilesh B. & Adhikari, Hari P. & Krolikowski, Marcin W. & Malm, James & Nguyen, Thanh T., 2022. "CEO gender and risk aversion: Further evidence using the composition of firm’s cash," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Finance, Elsevier, vol. 33(C).
    3. Felix Bolduan & Ivo Schedlinsky & Friedrich Sommer, 2021. "The influence of compensation interdependence on risk-taking: the role of mutual monitoring," Journal of Business Economics, Springer, vol. 91(8), pages 1125-1148, October.
    4. Spiros Bougheas & Jeroen Nieboerr & Martin Sefton, 2014. "Risk Taking and Information Aggregation in Groups," Discussion Papers 2014-09, The Centre for Decision Research and Experimental Economics, School of Economics, University of Nottingham.
    5. Matthaei, Eva Kristina & Kiesewetter, Dirk, 2020. "A problem shared is a problem halved? Risky tax avoidance decisions and intra-group payoff conflict," arqus Discussion Papers in Quantitative Tax Research 258, arqus - Arbeitskreis Quantitative Steuerlehre.
    6. Barrero-Amórtegui, Yady & Maldonado, Jorge H., 2021. "Gender composition of management groups in a conservation agreement framework: Experimental evidence for mangrove use in the Colombian Pacific," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 142(C).
    7. Bate Adisu Fanta, 2022. "The Nexus between Uncertainty Avoidance Culture and Risk-taking Behaviour in Entrepreneurial Firms’ Decision Making," Journal of Intercultural Management, Sciendo, vol. 14(1), pages 104-132, March.
    8. Fochmann, Martin & Fochmann, Nadja & Kocher, Martin G. & Müller, Nadja, 2021. "Dishonesty and risk-taking: Compliance decisions of individuals and groups," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 185(C), pages 250-286.
    9. Lima de Miranda, Katharina & Detlefsen, Lena & Schmidt, Ulrich, 2019. "Can gender quotas prevent risky choice shifts? The effect of gender composition on group decisions under risk," Kiel Working Papers 2135, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW Kiel).
    10. Golan Benita & Nadine Baudot-Trajtenberg & Amit Friedman, 2019. "The challenges of managing large FX reserves: the case of Israel," BIS Papers chapters, in: Bank for International Settlements (ed.), Reserve management and FX intervention, volume 104, pages 151-162, Bank for International Settlements.

  2. Bougheas, Spiros & Nieboer, Jeroen & Sefton, Martin, 2015. "Risk taking and information aggregation in groups," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 51(C), pages 34-47.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  3. Bougheas, Spiros & Nieboer, Jeroen & Sefton, Martin, 2013. "Risk-taking in social settings: Group and peer effects," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 92(C), pages 273-283.
    See citations under working paper version above.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

Access and download statistics for all items

Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 7 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-EXP: Experimental Economics (7) 2013-03-09 2013-07-15 2013-10-18 2015-01-14 2015-02-28 2015-06-20 2015-11-01. Author is listed
  2. NEP-CBE: Cognitive & Behavioural Economics (5) 2013-03-09 2013-10-18 2015-01-14 2015-06-20 2015-11-01. Author is listed
  3. NEP-CDM: Collective Decision-Making (3) 2013-03-09 2015-06-20 2015-11-01
  4. NEP-NET: Network Economics (3) 2013-07-15 2015-06-20 2015-11-01
  5. NEP-NEU: Neuroeconomics (2) 2015-01-14 2015-02-28
  6. NEP-ICT: Information & Communication Technologies (1) 2015-11-01
  7. NEP-SOC: Social Norms & Social Capital (1) 2013-07-15
  8. NEP-UPT: Utility Models & Prospect Theory (1) 2015-01-14
  9. NEP-URE: Urban & Real Estate Economics (1) 2013-07-15

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