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Transmission of information within transnational social networks: a field experiment

Author

Listed:
  • Natalia Candelo

    () (Queens College CUNY)

  • Rachel T. A. Croson

    () (Michigan State University)

  • Catherine Eckel

    () (Texas A&M University)

Abstract

Abstract Several studies have shown a relationship between the stocks of migrants and country-level investment in the home country; however the mechanism through which this relationship operates is still unexplored. We use a field experiment in which participants who are recent immigrants send information about risky decisions to others in their social network in their home country. The results demonstrate how this information influences decisions in the home country. We find that the advice given by family members and decisions made by friends significantly affects an individual’s risky decision-making.

Suggested Citation

  • Natalia Candelo & Rachel T. A. Croson & Catherine Eckel, 2018. "Transmission of information within transnational social networks: a field experiment," Experimental Economics, Springer;Economic Science Association, vol. 21(4), pages 905-923, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:expeco:v:21:y:2018:i:4:d:10.1007_s10683-017-9557-9
    DOI: 10.1007/s10683-017-9557-9
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Information; Social networks; Risk; Immigration; Field experiments;

    JEL classification:

    • H4 - Public Economics - - Publicly Provided Goods
    • C91 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments - - - Laboratory, Individual Behavior
    • C93 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments - - - Field Experiments

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