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Social Networks and Their Impact on the Employment and Earnings of Mexican Immigrants

  • Catalina Amuedo-Dorantes

    (San diego State University)

  • Kusum Mundra

    (San Diego State University)

We examine the impact of different types of social networks on the employment and wages of unauthorized and legal Mexican immigrants using data from the Mexican Migration Project. We find that social networks, particularly strong ties, contribute to the economic assimilation of immigrants by raising their hourly wages. However, networks do not enhance immigrants’ employability. Instead, strong ties allow for a lower employment likelihood possibly through the shelter against temporary unemployment provided by close family members. Finally, social networks do not alter the relative employment and earnings performance of unauthorized and legal immigrants in the absence of networks.

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File URL: http://128.118.178.162/eps/lab/papers/0502/0502001.pdf
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Paper provided by EconWPA in its series Labor and Demography with number 0502001.

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Length: 43 pages
Date of creation: 09 Feb 2005
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:wpa:wuwpla:0502001
Note: Type of Document - pdf; pages: 43
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://128.118.178.162

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