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The new labor market: Immigrants and wages after IRCA

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  • Julie Phillips
  • Douglas Massey

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  • Julie Phillips & Douglas Massey, 1999. "The new labor market: Immigrants and wages after IRCA," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 36(2), pages 233-246, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:demogr:v:36:y:1999:i:2:p:233-246
    DOI: 10.2307/2648111
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. C. Bansak & S. Raphael, "undated". "Immigration Reform and the Earnings of Latino Workers: Do Employer Sanctions Cause Discrimination?," Institute for Research on Poverty Discussion Papers 1181-98, University of Wisconsin Institute for Research on Poverty.
    2. Cobb-Clark, Deborah A & Shiells, Clinton R & Lowell, B Lindsay, 1995. "Immigration Reform: The Effects of Employer Sanctions and Legalization on Wages," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 13(3), pages 472-498, July.
    3. Oded Stark, 1991. "The Migration of Labor," Blackwell Books, Wiley Blackwell, number 1557860300, July.
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    Cited by:

    1. Adda, Jérôme & Pinotti, Paolo & Tura, Giulia, 2020. "There's More to Marriage than Love: The Effect of Legal Status and Cultural Distance on Intermarriages and Separations," CEPR Discussion Papers 14432, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    2. S. M. Kanaiaupuni, "undated". "Child Well-Being and the Intergenerational Effects of Undocumented Immigrant Status," Institute for Research on Poverty Discussion Papers 1210-00, University of Wisconsin Institute for Research on Poverty.
    3. Grace Melo & Gregory Colson & Octavio A. Ramirez, 2014. "Hispanic American Opinions toward Immigration and Immigration Policy Reform Proposals," Applied Economic Perspectives and Policy, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 36(4), pages 604-622.
    4. Catalina Amuedo-Dorantes & Kusum Mundra, 2007. "Social networks and their impact on the earnings of Mexican Migrants," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 44(4), pages 849-863, November.
    5. Magris, Francesco & Russo, Giuseppe, 2016. "Fiscal Revenues and Commitment in Immigration Amnesties," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 42(C), pages 75-90.
    6. Matthew Freedman & Emily Owens & Sarah Bohn, 2018. "Immigration, Employment Opportunities, and Criminal Behavior," American Economic Journal: Economic Policy, American Economic Association, vol. 10(2), pages 117-151, May.
    7. Sherrie A. Kossoudji & Deborah A. Cobb-Clark, 2002. "Coming out of the Shadows: Learning about Legal Status and Wages from the Legalized Population," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 20(3), pages 598-628, July.
    8. Dita Čermáková & Michal Nekorjak, 2009. "Ukrainian Middleman System Of Labour Organisation In The Czech Republic," Tijdschrift voor Economische en Sociale Geografie, Royal Dutch Geographical Society KNAG, vol. 100(1), pages 33-43, February.
    9. Rodolfo Gutiérrez, 2007. "Lengua, migraciones y mercado de trabajo," Documentos de Trabajo del Instituto Complutense de Estudios Internacionales 05-07, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Instituto Complutense de Estudios Internacionales.
    10. Giuntella, Osea, 2017. "Why does the health of Mexican immigrants deteriorate? New evidence from linked birth records," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 54(C), pages 1-16.
    11. Anita Alves Pena, 2012. "Undocumented immigration and the business of farm labor contracting in the USA," American Journal of Business, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 27(1), pages 10-26, April.

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