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Paulo Esteban Natenzon

Personal Details

First Name:Paulo
Middle Name:Esteban
Last Name:Natenzon
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pna312
[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]
http://pnatenzon.wustl.edu
WUSTL Department of Economics Campus Box 1208 1 Brookings Drive St. Louis, MO 63130 USA
Terminal Degree:2011 Department of Economics; Princeton University (from RePEc Genealogy)

Affiliation

Olin School of Business
Washington University in St. Louis

St. Louis, Missouri (United States)
http://www.olin.wustl.edu/

:

Campus Box 1133, One Brookings Drive, St. Louis MO 63130-4899
RePEc:edi:oswusus (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Paulo Natenzon, 2010. "Subjective Ambiguity and Preference for Flexibility," Working Papers 1265, Princeton University, Department of Economics, Econometric Research Program..

Articles

  1. Paulo Natenzon, 2019. "Random Choice and Learning," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 127(1), pages 419-457.
  2. Gorno, Leandro & Natenzon, Paulo, 2018. "Subjective ambiguity and preference for flexibility," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 154(C), pages 24-32.
  3. Faruk Gul & Paulo Natenzon & Wolfgang Pesendorfer, 2014. "Random Choice as Behavioral Optimization," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 82, pages 1873-1912, September.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Paulo Natenzon, 2010. "Subjective Ambiguity and Preference for Flexibility," Working Papers 1265, Princeton University, Department of Economics, Econometric Research Program..

    Cited by:

    1. Gorno, Leandro, 2016. "Additive representation for preferences over menus in finite choice settings," Journal of Mathematical Economics, Elsevier, vol. 65(C), pages 41-47.
    2. Richter, Michael & Rubinstein, Ariel, 2019. ""Convex preferences": a new definition," Theoretical Economics, Econometric Society, vol. 14(4).

Articles

  1. Paulo Natenzon, 2019. "Random Choice and Learning," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 127(1), pages 419-457.

    Cited by:

    1. Andrew Caplin & Daniel Martin, 2013. "A Testable Theory of Imperfect Perception," Levine's Working Paper Archive 786969000000000649, David K. Levine.
    2. Ronayne, David & Brown, Gordon D.A., 2016. "Multi-attribute decision by sampling: An account of the attraction, comprimise and similarity effects," The Warwick Economics Research Paper Series (TWERPS) 1124, University of Warwick, Department of Economics.
    3. Filip Matejka & Alisdair McKay, 2011. "Rational Inattention to Discrete Choices: A New Foundation for the Multinomial Logit Model," CERGE-EI Working Papers wp442, The Center for Economic Research and Graduate Education - Economics Institute, Prague.
    4. Victor H. Aguiar & Maria Jose Boccardi & Nail Kashaev & Jeongbin Kim, 2018. "Does Random Consideration Explain Behavior when Choice is Hard? Evidence from a Large-scale Experiment," Papers 1812.09619, arXiv.org, revised Jun 2019.
    5. HORAN, Sean & MANZINI, Paola, 2018. "Precision may harm: The comparative statics of imprecise judgement," Cahiers de recherche 2018-13, Universite de Montreal, Departement de sciences economiques.
    6. Jose Apesteguia & Miguel Ángel Ballester, 2018. "Separating Predicted Randomness from Noise," Working Papers 1018, Barcelona Graduate School of Economics.
    7. Duffy, Sean & Gussman, Steven & Smith, John, 2019. "Judgments of length in the economics laboratory: Are there brains in choice?," MPRA Paper 93126, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. Lang, Ruitian, 2019. "Try before you buy: A theory of dynamic information acquisition," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 183(C), pages 1057-1093.
    9. Gerasimou, Georgios, 2012. "Asymmetric Dominance, Deferral and Status Quo Bias in a Theory of Choice with Incomplete Preferences," MPRA Paper 40097, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    10. D. Pennesi, 2016. "Deciding fast and slow," Working Papers wp1082, Dipartimento Scienze Economiche, Universita' di Bologna.
    11. Michael Woodford, 2014. "An Optimizing Neuroeconomic Model of Discrete Choice," NBER Working Papers 19897, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    12. S. Cerreia-Vioglio & F. Maccheroni & M. Marinacci & A. Rustichini, 2017. "Multinomial logit processes and preference discovery: inside and outside the black box," Working Papers 615, IGIER (Innocenzo Gasparini Institute for Economic Research), Bocconi University.

  2. Gorno, Leandro & Natenzon, Paulo, 2018. "Subjective ambiguity and preference for flexibility," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 154(C), pages 24-32.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  3. Faruk Gul & Paulo Natenzon & Wolfgang Pesendorfer, 2014. "Random Choice as Behavioral Optimization," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 82, pages 1873-1912, September.

    Cited by:

    1. Manzini, Paola & Mariotti, Marco & Ulku, Levent, 2015. "Stochastic Complementarity," SIRE Discussion Papers 2015-60, Scottish Institute for Research in Economics (SIRE).
    2. Paola Manzini & Marco Mariotti, 2013. "Imperfect Attention and Menu Evaluation," Discussion Paper Series, School of Economics and Finance 201319, School of Economics and Finance, University of St Andrews, revised 08 Apr 2015.
    3. Aguiar, Victor H. & Boccardi, Maria Jose & Dean, Mark, 2016. "Satisficing and stochastic choice," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 166(C), pages 445-482.
    4. Steverson, Kai & Brandenburger, Adam & Glimcher, Paul, 2019. "Choice-theoretic foundations of the divisive normalization model," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 164(C), pages 148-165.
    5. Fabrizio Germano & Francesco Sobbrio, 2017. "Opinion Dynamics via Search Engines (and other Algorithmic Gatekeepers)," Working Papers 962, Barcelona Graduate School of Economics.
    6. Filip Matejka & Alisdair McKay, 2011. "Rational Inattention to Discrete Choices: A New Foundation for the Multinomial Logit Model," CERGE-EI Working Papers wp442, The Center for Economic Research and Graduate Education - Economics Institute, Prague.
    7. Manzini, Paola & Mariotti, Marco, 2012. "Stochastic Choice and Consideration Sets," IZA Discussion Papers 6905, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    8. Mogens Fosgerau & Emerson Melo & André de Palma & Matthew Shum, 2017. "Discrete Choice and Rational Inattention: a General Equivalence Result," Discussion Papers 17-26, University of Copenhagen. Department of Economics.
    9. Echenique, Federico & Saito, Kota & Tserenjigmid, Gerelt, 2018. "The perception-adjusted Luce model," Mathematical Social Sciences, Elsevier, vol. 93(C), pages 67-76.
    10. Mira Frick & Ryota Iijima & Tomasz Strzalecki, 2017. "Dynamic Random Utility," Cowles Foundation Discussion Papers 2092R, Cowles Foundation for Research in Economics, Yale University, revised Nov 2018.
    11. Jose Apesteguia & Miguel Ángel Ballester, 2010. "A Measure of Rationality and Welfare," Working Papers 467, Barcelona Graduate School of Economics.
    12. Victor H. Aguiar & Maria Jose Boccardi & Nail Kashaev & Jeongbin Kim, 2018. "Does Random Consideration Explain Behavior when Choice is Hard? Evidence from a Large-scale Experiment," Papers 1812.09619, arXiv.org, revised Jun 2019.
    13. Jose Apesteguia & Miguel Ángel Ballester, 2018. "Separating Predicted Randomness from Noise," Working Papers 1018, Barcelona Graduate School of Economics.
    14. Paola Manzini & Marco Mariotti, 2011. "A General Behavioural Model of Random Choice," Carlo Alberto Notebooks 237, Collegio Carlo Alberto.
    15. Ma, Wei, 2017. "Perturbed utility and general equilibrium analysis," Journal of Mathematical Economics, Elsevier, vol. 73(C), pages 122-131.
    16. Breitmoser, Yves, 2017. "Discrete Choice with Presentation Effects," Rationality and Competition Discussion Paper Series 35, CRC TRR 190 Rationality and Competition.
    17. Matias D. Cattaneo & Xinwei Ma & Yusufcan Masatlioglu & Elchin Suleymanov, 2017. "A Random Attention Model," Papers 1712.03448, arXiv.org, revised Aug 2019.
    18. Ahn, David S. & Echenique, Federico & Saito, Kota, 2018. "On path independent stochastic choice," Theoretical Economics, Econometric Society, vol. 13(1), January.
    19. Wei Ma, 2017. "Perturbed Utility and General Equilibrium Analysis," Working Papers 201701, University of Pretoria, Department of Economics.
    20. Jose Apesteguia & Miguel Angel Ballester, 2014. "Discrete Choice Estimation of Time Preferences," Working Papers 787, Barcelona Graduate School of Economics.
    21. Jose Apesteguia & Miguel A. Ballester, 2016. "Single-crossing random utility models," Economics Working Papers 1515, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra.
    22. Daniel E. Chavez & Marco A. Palma, 2019. "Pushing subjects beyond rationality with more alternatives in experimental auctions," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 50(2), pages 207-217, March.
    23. Breitmoser, Yves, 2018. "The Axiomatic Foundation of Logit," Rationality and Competition Discussion Paper Series 78, CRC TRR 190 Rationality and Competition.
    24. D. Pennesi, 2016. "Intertemporal discrete choice," Working Papers wp1061, Dipartimento Scienze Economiche, Universita' di Bologna.
    25. Bleile, Jörg, 2016. "Limited Attention in Case-Based Belief Formation," Center for Mathematical Economics Working Papers 518, Center for Mathematical Economics, Bielefeld University.
    26. Manzini, Paola & Mariotti, Marco, 2018. "Dual random utility maximisation," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 177(C), pages 162-182.
    27. Yosuke Hashidate, 2018. "Preferences for Randomization and Anticipated Utility," CIRJE F-Series CIRJE-F-1083, CIRJE, Faculty of Economics, University of Tokyo.
    28. Federico Echenique & Kota Saito, 2019. "General Luce model," Economic Theory, Springer;Society for the Advancement of Economic Theory (SAET), vol. 68(4), pages 811-826, November.
    29. Ubøe, Jan & Andersson, Jonas & Jörnsten, Kurt & Lillestøl, Jostein & Sandal, Leif, 2017. "Statistical testing of bounded rationality with applications to the newsvendor model," European Journal of Operational Research, Elsevier, vol. 259(1), pages 251-261.
    30. Jose Apesteguia & Miguel A. Ballester, 2016. "Stochastic representatitve agent," Economics Working Papers 1536, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra.
    31. Clithero, John A., 2018. "Improving out-of-sample predictions using response times and a model of the decision process," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 148(C), pages 344-375.
    32. Jose Apesteguia & Miguel Ángel Ballester, 2016. "Stochastic Representative Agent," Working Papers 928, Barcelona Graduate School of Economics.

More information

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Co-authorship network on CollEc

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