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Dual random utility maximisation

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  • Manzini, Paola
  • Mariotti, Marco

Abstract

Many prominent regularities of stochastic choice, such as the attraction, similarity and compromise effects, are incompatible with Random Utility Maximisation (RUM) as they violate Monotonicity. We argue that these regularities can be conveniently represented by a variation of RUM in which utility depends on only two states and state probabilities are allowed to depend on the menu. We call this model Dual Random Utility Maximisation (dRUM). dRUM is a parsimonious model that admits violations of Monotonicity. We characterise dRUM in terms of three transparent expansion/contraction conditions. We also characterise the important special case in which state probabilities are constant across menus.

Suggested Citation

  • Manzini, Paola & Mariotti, Marco, 2018. "Dual random utility maximisation," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 177(C), pages 162-182.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jetheo:v:177:y:2018:i:c:p:162-182
    DOI: 10.1016/j.jet.2018.05.015
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    Cited by:

    1. Donni, Olivier & Molina, José Alberto, 2018. "Household Collective Models: Three Decades of Theoretical Contributions and Empirical Evidence," IZA Discussion Papers 11915, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    2. Demirkan, Yusufcan & Kimya, Mert, 2020. "Hazard rate, stochastic choice and consideration sets," Journal of Mathematical Economics, Elsevier, vol. 87(C), pages 142-150.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Stochastic choice; Attraction effect; Similarity effect;

    JEL classification:

    • D03 - Microeconomics - - General - - - Behavioral Microeconomics: Underlying Principles
    • D01 - Microeconomics - - General - - - Microeconomic Behavior: Underlying Principles

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