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Jacob A. Mortenson

Personal Details

First Name:Jacob
Middle Name:A.
Last Name:Mortenson
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pmo893
[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]
http://jacobmortenson.com/

Affiliation

Joint Committee on Taxation
United States Congress
Government of the United States

Washington, District of Columbia (United States)
http://www.house.gov/jct/

:


RePEc:edi:jctgvus (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Jeff Larrimore & Jacob Mortenson & David Splinter, 2017. "Household Incomes in Tax Data : Using Addresses to Move from Tax Unit to Household Income Distributions," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2017-002, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (US).
  2. David Splinter & Jeff Larrimore & Jacob Mortenson, 2017. "Whose Child Is This? Shifting of Dependents Among EITC Claimants Within the Same Household," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2017-089, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (US).
  3. Larrimore, Jeff & Mortenson, Jacob & Splinter, David, 2015. "Income and Earnings Mobility in U.S. Tax Data," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2015-61, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (US).

Articles

  1. Jacob A. Mortenson & Heidi R. Schramm & Andrew Whitten, 2019. "The Effects of Required Minimum Distribution Rules on Withdrawals from Traditional IRAs," National Tax Journal, National Tax Association;National Tax Journal, vol. 72(3), pages 507-542, September.
  2. Bradley T. Heim & Jacob A. Mortenson, 2018. "The Effect Of Recent Tax Changes On Taxable Income: Correction And Update," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 37(3), pages 686-694, June.
  3. David Splinter & Jeff Larrimore & Jacob Mortenson, 2017. "Whose Child Is This? Shifting of Dependents among EITC Claimants within the Same Household," National Tax Journal, National Tax Association;National Tax Journal, vol. 70(4), pages 737-758, December.
  4. Seth H. Giertz & Jacob A. Mortenson, 2013. "Recent Income Trends for Top Executives: Evidence From Tax Return Data," National Tax Journal, National Tax Association;National Tax Journal, vol. 66(4), pages 913-938, December.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Jeff Larrimore & Jacob Mortenson & David Splinter, 2017. "Household Incomes in Tax Data : Using Addresses to Move from Tax Unit to Household Income Distributions," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2017-002, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (US).

    Cited by:

    1. Richard V. Burkhauser & Nicolas Hérault & Stephen P. Jenkins & Roger Wilkins, 2018. "Survey Under‐Coverage of Top Incomes and Estimation of Inequality: What is the Role of the UK's SPI Adjustment?," Fiscal Studies, John Wiley & Sons, vol. 39(2), pages 213-240, June.
    2. Jesse Bricker & Alice M. Henriques & Lars Peter Hansen, 2018. "How Much has Wealth Concentration Grown in the United States? A Re-Examination of Data from 2001-2013," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2018-024, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (US).
    3. Gerald Auten & David Splinter, 2019. "Top 1 Percent Income Shares: Comparing Estimates Using Tax Data," AEA Papers and Proceedings, American Economic Association, vol. 109, pages 307-311, May.
    4. David Splinter & Jeff Larrimore & Jacob Mortenson, 2017. "Whose Child Is This? Shifting of Dependents Among EITC Claimants Within the Same Household," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2017-089, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (US).
    5. Burkhauser, Richard V. & Hérault, Nicolas & Jenkins, Stephen P. & Wilkins, Roger, 2017. "Survey under-coverage of top incomes and estimation of inequality: what is the role of the UK’s SPI adjustment?," ISER Working Paper Series 2017-08, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    6. Jeff Larrimore & Richard V. Burkhauser & Gerald Auten & Philip Armour, 2016. "Recent Trends in U.S. Top Income Shares in Tax Record Data Using More Comprehensive Measures of Income Including Accrued Capital Gains," NBER Working Papers 23007, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

  2. Larrimore, Jeff & Mortenson, Jacob & Splinter, David, 2015. "Income and Earnings Mobility in U.S. Tax Data," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2015-61, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (US).

    Cited by:

    1. Jeff Larrimore & Jacob Mortenson & David Splinter, 2017. "Household Incomes in Tax Data : Using Addresses to Move from Tax Unit to Household Income Distributions," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2017-002, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (US).
    2. Mario Alloza, 2016. "The Impact of Taxes on Income Mobility," Discussion Papers 1632, Centre for Macroeconomics (CFM).

Articles

  1. Bradley T. Heim & Jacob A. Mortenson, 2018. "The Effect Of Recent Tax Changes On Taxable Income: Correction And Update," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 37(3), pages 686-694, June.

    Cited by:

    1. Neisser, Carina, 2017. "The elasticity of taxable income: A meta-regression analysis," ZEW Discussion Papers 17-032, ZEW - Leibniz Centre for European Economic Research.
    2. Neisser, Carina, 2018. "The Elasticity of Taxable Income: A Meta-Regression Analysis," IZA Discussion Papers 11958, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    3. Carina Neisser, 2017. "The elasticity of taxable income: A meta-regression analysis," Working Papers 2017/10, Institut d'Economia de Barcelona (IEB).

  2. Seth H. Giertz & Jacob A. Mortenson, 2013. "Recent Income Trends for Top Executives: Evidence From Tax Return Data," National Tax Journal, National Tax Association;National Tax Journal, vol. 66(4), pages 913-938, December.

    Cited by:

    1. Neisser, Carina, 2017. "The elasticity of taxable income: A meta-regression analysis," ZEW Discussion Papers 17-032, ZEW - Leibniz Centre for European Economic Research.
    2. Carina Neisser, 2017. "The elasticity of taxable income: A meta-regression analysis," Working Papers 2017/10, Institut d'Economia de Barcelona (IEB).

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

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Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 3 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-PBE: Public Economics (3) 2015-08-30 2017-01-15 2017-09-03. Author is listed
  2. NEP-PUB: Public Finance (3) 2015-08-30 2017-01-15 2017-09-03. Author is listed
  3. NEP-DEM: Demographic Economics (1) 2015-08-30. Author is listed
  4. NEP-GER: German Papers (1) 2015-08-30. Author is listed

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