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Jack Britton

Personal Details

First Name:Jack
Middle Name:
Last Name:Britton
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pbr670
Terminal Degree:2014 School of Economics; University of Bristol (from RePEc Genealogy)

Affiliation

(50%) ESRC Centre for the Microeconomic Analysis of Public Policy (CPP)
Institute for Fiscal Studies (IFS)

London, United Kingdom
http://www.ifs.org.uk/centres/cpp/
RePEc:edi:cfifsuk (more details at EDIRC)

(50%) Institute for Fiscal Studies (IFS)

London, United Kingdom
http://www.ifs.org.uk/
RePEc:edi:ifsssuk (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Jack W. Britton & Jonathan Gruber, 2019. "Do Income Contingent Student Loan Programs Distort Earnings? Evidence from the UK," NBER Working Papers 25822, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Jack Britton & Neil Shephard & Anna Vignoles, 2015. "Comparing sample survey measures of English earnings of graduates with administrative data during the Great Recession," IFS Working Papers W15/28, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
  3. Jack Britton & Carol Propper, 2014. "Does Wage Regulation Harm Children? Evidence from English Schools," The Centre for Market and Public Organisation 14/318, The Centre for Market and Public Organisation, University of Bristol, UK.
  4. Carol Propper & Jack Britton, 2012. "Does Wage Regulation Harm Kids? Evidence from English Schools," The Centre for Market and Public Organisation 12/293, The Centre for Market and Public Organisation, University of Bristol, UK.

Articles

  1. Britton, Jack & Propper, Carol, 2016. "Teacher pay and school productivity: Exploiting wage regulation," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 133(C), pages 75-89.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Jack W. Britton & Jonathan Gruber, 2019. "Do Income Contingent Student Loan Programs Distort Earnings? Evidence from the UK," NBER Working Papers 25822, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    Cited by:

    1. Stuart Adam & James Browne & David Phillips & Barra Roantree, 2017. "Frictions and taxpayer responses: evidence from bunching at personal tax thresholds," IFS Working Papers W17/14, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
    2. Abraham, Katharine G. & Filiz-Ozbay, Emel & Ozbay, Erkut Y. & Turner, Lesley J., 2020. "Framing effects, earnings expectations, and the design of student loan repayment schemes," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 183(C).
    3. Hantzsche, Arno & Young, Garry, 2022. "Financing Higher Education in England: The Fiscal Implications of Reform," National Institute of Economic and Social Research (NIESR) Discussion Papers 539, National Institute of Economic and Social Research.
    4. Camilo Andrés Garzón-Correa & Atilio Bustos-González & Melisa López-Hernández & Eduardo Calderón & Oscar Cespedes, 2022. "Challenges and Difficulties in Implementing an Income-Contingent-Financing Model in Higher Education in Colombia," Sustainability, MDPI, vol. 14(13), pages 1-14, July.
    5. Sylvain Catherine & Constantine Yannelis, 2020. "The Distributional Effects of Student Loan Forgiveness," Working Papers 2020-169, Becker Friedman Institute for Research In Economics.

  2. Jack Britton & Neil Shephard & Anna Vignoles, 2015. "Comparing sample survey measures of English earnings of graduates with administrative data during the Great Recession," IFS Working Papers W15/28, Institute for Fiscal Studies.

    Cited by:

    1. Adamecz-Völgyi, Anna & Henderson, Morag & Shure, Nikki, 2020. "The Labor Market Returns to 'First in Family' University Graduates," IZA Discussion Papers 13911, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    2. Hermannsson, Kristinn & Lecca, Patrizio & Swales, J. Kim, 2014. "How much does a single graduation cohort from further education colleges contribute to an open regional economy?," SIRE Discussion Papers 2014-004, Scottish Institute for Research in Economics (SIRE).
    3. Jack Britton & Lorraine Dearden & Neil Shephard & Anna Vignoles, 2016. "How English domiciled graduate earnings vary with gender, institution attended, subject and socio-economic background," IFS Working Papers W16/06, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
    4. Pascale Bourquin & Tom Waters, 2022. "Jobs and job quality between the eve of the Great Recession and the eve of COVID‐19," Fiscal Studies, John Wiley & Sons, vol. 43(1), pages 63-78, March.
    5. Buchmueller, Gerda & Walker, Ian, 2020. "The Graduate Wage and Earnings Premia and the Role of Non-Cognitive Skills," IZA Discussion Papers 13248, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    6. Peter Ainsworth & Tom McKenzie & Al Stroyny, 2016. "Incentive Effects in Higher Education: an Improved Funding Model for Universities," Economic Affairs, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 36(3), pages 239-257, October.

  3. Carol Propper & Jack Britton, 2012. "Does Wage Regulation Harm Kids? Evidence from English Schools," The Centre for Market and Public Organisation 12/293, The Centre for Market and Public Organisation, University of Bristol, UK.

    Cited by:

    1. Cardullo, Gabriele, 2015. "The Welfare and Employment Effects of Centralized Public Sector Wage Bargaining," MPRA Paper 66879, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Rowena Crawford & Richard Disney, 2015. "Wage regulation and the quality of police officer recruits," IFS Working Papers W15/19, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
    3. Yi Long & Chris Nyland & Russell Smyth, 2016. "Fiscal Decentralisation, the Knowledge Economy and School Teachers’ Wages in Urban China," Monash Economics Working Papers 13-16, Monash University, Department of Economics.

Articles

  1. Britton, Jack & Propper, Carol, 2016. "Teacher pay and school productivity: Exploiting wage regulation," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 133(C), pages 75-89.

    Cited by:

    1. Adrien Montalbo, 2019. "Education and economic development. The influence of primary schooling on municipalities in nineteenth-century France," PSE Working Papers halshs-02286126, HAL.
    2. Jo Blanden & Matthias Doepke & Jan Stuhler, 2022. "Educational Inequality," Working Papers 2022-013, Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group.
    3. Nagler, Markus & Piopiunik, Marc & West, Martin R., 2015. "Weak Markets, Strong Teachers: Recession at Career Start and Teacher Effectiveness," Discussion Papers in Economics 25110, University of Munich, Department of Economics.
    4. Arthur Guillouzouic--Le Corff & Emeric Henry & Joan Monras, 2021. "Local Public Goods and the Spatial Distribution of Economic Activity," Sciences Po Economics Discussion Papers 2021-05, Sciences Po Departement of Economics.
    5. Montalbo, Adrien, 2021. "Schools without a law: Primary education in France from the Revolution to the Guizot Law," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 79(C).
    6. Jon Marius Vaag Iversen & Bjarne Strøm, 2020. "Skills, Employment, and Labor Market Institutions: Evidence from PIAAC," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 34(3), pages 277-304, September.
    7. Grönqvist, Erik & Hensvik, Lena & Thoresson, Anna, 2020. "Teacher career opportunities and school quality," Working Paper Series 2020:2, IFAU - Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy.
    8. Braga, Michela & Checchi, Daniele & Scervini, Francesco & Garrouste, Christelle, 2020. "Selecting or rewarding teachers? International evidence from primary schools," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 76(C).
    9. Adrien Montalbo, 2019. "Education and economic development. The influence of primary schooling on municipalities in nineteenth-century France," Working Papers halshs-02286126, HAL.
    10. José María Cabrera & Dinand Webbink., 2018. "Do higher salaries yield better teachers and better student outcomes?," Documentos de Trabajo/Working Papers 1804, Facultad de Ciencias Empresariales y Economia. Universidad de Montevideo..
    11. Rowena Crawford & Richard Disney, 2018. "Wage Regulation and the Quality of Police Applicants," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 85(340), pages 701-734, October.
    12. Westphal, Matthias, 2017. "More teachers, smarter students? Potential side effects of the German educational expansion," Ruhr Economic Papers 721, RWI - Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-University Bochum, TU Dortmund University, University of Duisburg-Essen.
    13. Natalia N. Karmaeva & Natalya V. Rodina, 2019. "The Implementation Of Performance-Related Pay In Collaboration With Employers: The Cases Of Two Russian Vocational Schools," HSE Working papers WP BRP 55/EDU/2019, National Research University Higher School of Economics.
    14. Barigozzi, Francesca & Parasnis, Jaai & Tani, Massimiliano, 2022. "Gender, Motivation, and Self-Selection into Teaching," IZA Discussion Papers 15532, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    15. Willén, Alexander, 2019. "Decentralization of wage determination. Evidence from a national teacher reform," Working Paper Series 2019:17, IFAU - Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy, revised 28 Jun 2019.
    16. Asma Benhenda, 2020. "The impact of school facility expenditures on pupil attainment," CEPEO Briefing Note Series 10, UCL Centre for Education Policy and Equalising Opportunities, revised Nov 2020.
    17. Kraft, Matthew A. & Brunner, Eric J. & Dougherty, Shaun M. & Schwegman, David J., 2020. "Teacher accountability reforms and the supply and quality of new teachers," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 188(C).
    18. Gjefsen, Hege Marie, 2020. "Wages, teacher recruitment, and student achievement," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 65(C).
    19. Geys, Benny & Heggedal, Tom-Reiel & Sørensen, Rune J., 2017. "Are bureaucrats paid like CEOs? Performance compensation and turnover of top civil servants," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 152(C), pages 47-54.
    20. Greaves, Ellen & Sibieta, Luke, 2019. "Constrained optimisation? Teacher salaries, school resources and student achievement," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 73(C).
    21. Burgess, Simon & Greaves, Ellen & Murphy, Richard, 2022. "Deregulating Teacher Labor Markets," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 88(C).
    22. Blackburn, McKinley L., 2021. "Are U.S. teacher salaries competitive? Accounting for geography and the retransformation bias in logarithmic regressions," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 84(C).
    23. Yeşilırmak, Muharrem, 2019. "Bonus pay for teachers, spatial sorting, and student achievement," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 59(C), pages 129-158.
    24. Deng, Weiguang & Li, Xue & Wu, Huayun & Xu, Guozheng, 2020. "Student leadership and academic performance," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 60(C).
    25. Emma García & Eunice S. Han, 2022. "Teachers’ Base Salary and Districts’ Academic Performance: Evidence From National Data," SAGE Open, , vol. 12(1), pages 21582440221, March.
    26. Kemp, Jack, 2022. "The Educational Impact of Weakening Teachers’ Unions : Evidence from Wisconsin," Warwick-Monash Economics Student Papers 39, Warwick Monash Economics Student Papers.
    27. Abott, Carolyn & Kogan, Vladimir & Lavertu, Stéphane & Peskowitz, Zachary, 2020. "School district operational spending and student outcomes: Evidence from tax elections in seven states," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 183(C).
    28. Juan Saavedra & Dario Maldonado & Lucrecia Santibanez & Luis Omar Herrera Prada, 2017. "Premium or Penalty? Labor Market Returns to Novice Public Sector Teachers," NBER Working Papers 24012, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

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Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 2 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-BEC: Business Economics (1) 2019-05-20
  2. NEP-CTA: Contract Theory & Applications (1) 2015-04-19
  3. NEP-EDU: Education (1) 2015-04-19
  4. NEP-EUR: Microeconomic European Issues (1) 2019-05-20
  5. NEP-LMA: Labor Markets - Supply, Demand, & Wages (1) 2019-05-20
  6. NEP-LTV: Unemployment, Inequality & Poverty (1) 2019-05-20
  7. NEP-URE: Urban & Real Estate Economics (1) 2015-04-19

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