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Eric Crampton

Personal Details

First Name:Eric
Middle Name:
Last Name:Crampton
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pcr13
http://www.econ.canterbury.ac.nz/personal_pages/eric_crampton/index.html
Department of Economics Private Bag 4800 University of Canterbury Christchurch, New Zealand
+64 (3) 364 2824

Affiliation

(95%) The New Zealand Initiative

Wellington, New Zealand
http://nzinitiative.org.nz/

: +64 4 499 0790

Level 12, Bayleys Building, Brandon Street, Wellington
RePEc:edi:nzininz (more details at EDIRC)

(5%) Department of Economics and Finance
College of Business and Economics
University of Canterbury

Christchurch, New Zealand
http://www.econ.canterbury.ac.nz/

: +64-3-3642631
+64-3-3642635
Private Bag 4800, Christchurch
RePEc:edi:decannz (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles Books

Working papers

  1. Eric Crampton & Matt Burgess & Brad Taylor, 2011. "The Cost of Cost Studies," Working Papers in Economics 11/29, University of Canterbury, Department of Economics and Finance.
  2. Matt Burgess & Eric Crampton, 2009. "The Price of everything The Value of Nothing: A (Truly) External Review Of BERL’s Study Of Harmful Alcohol and Drug Use," Working Papers in Economics 09/10, University of Canterbury, Department of Economics and Finance.
  3. Eric Crampton & Donald Boudreaux, 2004. "Does Cyberspace Need Antitrust?," Industrial Organization 0401001, EconWPA.
  4. Eric Crampton & Andrew Farrant, 2004. "Expressive and Instrumental Voting: The Scylla and Charybdis of Constitutional Political Economy," Public Economics 0401002, EconWPA.
  5. Eric Crampton, 2002. "Distributive Politics in a Strong Party System: Evidence from Canadian Job Grant Programs," Microeconomics 0211001, EconWPA.
  6. Eric Crampton, 2002. "You Get What You Vote For: Electoral Determinants of Economic Freedom," Public Economics 0211003, EconWPA.

Articles

  1. Eric Crampton & Andrew Farrant, 2004. "Expressive and Instrumental Voting: The Scylla and Charybdis of Constitutional Political Economy," Constitutional Political Economy, Springer, vol. 15(1), pages 77-88, March.
  2. Eric Crampton, 2002. "You Get What You Vote For : Voter Preferences and Economic Freedom," Journal of Private Enterprise, The Association of Private Enterprise Education, vol. 18(Fall 2002), pages 29-56.

Books

  1. Tyler Cowen & Eric Crampton (ed.), 2002. "Market Failure or Success," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 2759.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Matt Burgess & Eric Crampton, 2009. "The Price of everything The Value of Nothing: A (Truly) External Review Of BERL’s Study Of Harmful Alcohol and Drug Use," Working Papers in Economics 09/10, University of Canterbury, Department of Economics and Finance.

    Cited by:

    1. Eric Crampton & Matt Burgess & Brad Taylor, 2011. "The Cost of Cost Studies," Working Papers in Economics 11/29, University of Canterbury, Department of Economics and Finance.

  2. Eric Crampton & Donald Boudreaux, 2004. "Does Cyberspace Need Antitrust?," Industrial Organization 0401001, EconWPA.

    Cited by:

    1. Büthe, Tim & Morgan, Stephen, 2015. "Antitrust Enforcement and Foreign Competition: Special Interest Theory Reconsidered," 2015 AAEA & WAEA Joint Annual Meeting, July 26-28, San Francisco, California 205607, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association;Western Agricultural Economics Association.

  3. Eric Crampton & Andrew Farrant, 2004. "Expressive and Instrumental Voting: The Scylla and Charybdis of Constitutional Political Economy," Public Economics 0401002, EconWPA.

    Cited by:

    1. Hamlin, Alan & Jennings, Colin, 2009. "Expressive Political Behaviour: Foundations, Scope and Implications," SIRE Discussion Papers 2009-41, Scottish Institute for Research in Economics (SIRE).

  4. Eric Crampton, 2002. "Distributive Politics in a Strong Party System: Evidence from Canadian Job Grant Programs," Microeconomics 0211001, EconWPA.

    Cited by:

    1. Andrew Leigh, 2008. "Bringing home the bacon: an empirical analysis of the extent and effects of pork-barreling in Australian politics," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 137(1), pages 279-299, October.
    2. Jennes, Geert & Persyn, Damiaan, 2015. "The effect of political representation on the geographic distribution of income: Evidence using Belgian data," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 37(C), pages 178-194.
    3. Larcinese, Valentino & Snyder, James M. & Testa, Cecilia, 2013. "Testing Models of Distributive Politics using Exit Polls to Measure Voters’ Preferences and Partisanship," British Journal of Political Science, Cambridge University Press, vol. 43(04), pages 845-875, October.
    4. McIntosh Craig & Allen Jacob, 2009. "Using the Error in Pre-Election Polls to Test for the Presence of Pork," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 9(1), pages 1-37, March.
    5. Valentino Larcinese & James M. Snyder, Jr. & Cecilia Testa, 2006. "Testing Models Of Distributive Politicsusing Exit Polls To Measure Voterpreferences And Partisanship," STICERD - Political Economy and Public Policy Paper Series 19, Suntory and Toyota International Centres for Economics and Related Disciplines, LSE.
    6. Kevin Milligan & Michael Smart, 2005. "Regional Grants as Pork Barrel Politics," CESifo Working Paper Series 1453, CESifo Group Munich.

  5. Eric Crampton, 2002. "You Get What You Vote For: Electoral Determinants of Economic Freedom," Public Economics 0211003, EconWPA.

    Cited by:

    1. Jamie Bologna & Joshua C. Hall, 2014. "Economic Freedom Research: Some Comments and Suggestions," Working Papers 14-23, Department of Economics, West Virginia University.
    2. Stringham, Edward Peter, 2011. "Embracing morals in economics: The role of internal moral constraints in a market economy," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 78(1), pages 98-109.
    3. George R. Crowley & John A. Dove & Daniel Sutter, 2017. "Voter Preferences, Institutions, And Economic Freedom," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 35(1), pages 76-92, January.
    4. Hall Joshua C. & Lawson Robert A. & Wogsland Rachael, 2011. "The European Union and Economic Freedom," Global Economy Journal, De Gruyter, vol. 11(3), pages 1-16, September.

Articles

  1. Eric Crampton & Andrew Farrant, 2004. "Expressive and Instrumental Voting: The Scylla and Charybdis of Constitutional Political Economy," Constitutional Political Economy, Springer, vol. 15(1), pages 77-88, March. See citations under working paper version above.
  2. Eric Crampton, 2002. "You Get What You Vote For : Voter Preferences and Economic Freedom," Journal of Private Enterprise, The Association of Private Enterprise Education, vol. 18(Fall 2002), pages 29-56.

    Cited by:

    1. Joshua C. Hall, 2016. "Institutional convergence: exit or voice?," Journal of Economics and Finance, Springer;Academy of Economics and Finance, vol. 40(4), pages 829-840, October.
    2. Benjamin Powell & Matt E. Ryan, 2017. "The Global Spread of Think Tanks and Economic Freedom," Journal of Private Enterprise, The Association of Private Enterprise Education, vol. 32(Fall 2017), pages 17-31.
    3. George R. Crowley & John A. Dove & Daniel Sutter, 2017. "Voter Preferences, Institutions, And Economic Freedom," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 35(1), pages 76-92, January.
    4. Hall Joshua C. & Lawson Robert A. & Wogsland Rachael, 2011. "The European Union and Economic Freedom," Global Economy Journal, De Gruyter, vol. 11(3), pages 1-16, September.

Books

  1. Tyler Cowen & Eric Crampton (ed.), 2002. "Market Failure or Success," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 2759.

    Cited by:

    1. Eric Crampton & Donald Boudreaux, 2004. "Does Cyberspace Need Antitrust?," Industrial Organization 0401001, EconWPA.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

Access and download statistics for all items

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 6 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-PBE: Public Economics (3) 2002-11-10 2002-11-18 2004-01-12
  2. NEP-POL: Positive Political Economics (3) 2002-11-10 2002-11-18 2004-01-12
  3. NEP-CDM: Collective Decision-Making (2) 2002-11-18 2004-01-12
  4. NEP-COM: Industrial Competition (1) 2004-01-12
  5. NEP-EDU: Education (1) 2004-01-12
  6. NEP-HPE: History & Philosophy of Economics (1) 2004-01-12
  7. NEP-IND: Industrial Organization (1) 2004-01-12
  8. NEP-LAW: Law & Economics (1) 2004-01-12
  9. NEP-NET: Network Economics (1) 2004-01-25

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