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Ride‐Sharing, Fatal Crashes, and Crime

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  • Angela K. Dills
  • Sean E. Mulholland

Abstract

The advent of smart‐phone based, ride‐sharing applications has revolutionized the vehicle for hire market. Advocates point to the ease of use, lower prices, and shorter wait times compared to hailing a taxi or prearranging limousine service. Others argue that proper government oversight is necessary to protect ride‐share passengers from driver error or vehicle parts failures and violence from unlicensed strangers. Using U.S. county‐level data from 2007 through 2015, we investigate whether the introduction of the ride‐sharing service Uber is associated with changes in fatal vehicle crashes and crime. We find that Uber's entry lowers the rate of DUIs and fatal accidents. For some specifications, we also find declines in arrests for assault and disorderly conduct. Conversely, we observe an increase in vehicle thefts.

Suggested Citation

  • Angela K. Dills & Sean E. Mulholland, 2018. "Ride‐Sharing, Fatal Crashes, and Crime," Southern Economic Journal, John Wiley & Sons, vol. 84(4), pages 965-991, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:wly:soecon:v:84:y:2018:i:4:p:965-991
    DOI: 10.1002/soej.12255
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    2. Teltser, Keith & Lennon, Conor & Burgdorf, Jacob, 2021. "Do ridesharing services increase alcohol consumption?," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 77(C).
    3. Xiatian Wu & Don MacKenzie, 2022. "The evolution, usage and trip patterns of taxis & ridesourcing services: evidence from 2001, 2009 & 2017 US National Household Travel Survey," Transportation, Springer, vol. 49(1), pages 293-311, February.
    4. Alejandro Tirachini, 2020. "Ride-hailing, travel behaviour and sustainable mobility: an international review," Transportation, Springer, vol. 47(4), pages 2011-2047, August.
    5. Ngo, Nicole S. & Götschi, Thomas & Clark, Benjamin Y., 2021. "The effects of ride-hailing services on bus ridership in a medium-sized urban area using micro-level data: Evidence from the Lane Transit District," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 105(C), pages 44-53.
    6. Chalfin, Aaron & Danagoulian, Shooshan & Deza, Monica, 2019. "More sneezing, less crime? Health shocks and the market for offenses," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 68(C).
    7. Antonio Menor-Campos & María de los Baños García-Moreno & Tomás López-Guzmán & Amalia Hidalgo-Fernández, 2019. "Effects of Collaborative Economy: A Reflection," Social Sciences, MDPI, vol. 8(5), pages 1-13, May.
    8. Yash Babar & Gordon Burtch, 2020. "Examining the Heterogeneous Impact of Ride-Hailing Services on Public Transit Use," Information Systems Research, INFORMS, vol. 31(3), pages 820-834, September.
    9. Zhou, You, 2020. "Ride-sharing, alcohol consumption, and drunk driving," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 85(C).
    10. Hall, Jonathan D. & Palsson, Craig & Price, Joseph, 2018. "Is Uber a substitute or complement for public transit?," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 108(C), pages 36-50.
    11. Barreto, Yuri & Silveira Neto, Raul da Mota & Carazza, Luis, 2021. "Uber and traffic safety: Evidence from Brazilian cities," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 123(C).
    12. John S. Heywood & Bryan Weber, 2019. "University-provided transit and crime in an urban neighborhood," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 62(3), pages 467-495, June.
    13. Kirk, David S. & Cavalli, Nicolo & Brazil, Noli, 2020. "The implications of ridehailing for risky driving and road accident injuries and fatalities," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 250(C).
    14. Sonny Rosenthal & Jean Yi Colette Tan & Ting Fang Poh, 2020. "Reputation Cues as Signals in the Sharing Economy," Social Sciences, MDPI, vol. 9(4), pages 1-14, April.
    15. Wang, Hai & Yang, Hai, 2019. "Ridesourcing systems: A framework and review," Transportation Research Part B: Methodological, Elsevier, vol. 129(C), pages 122-155.
    16. Alejandro Tirachini & Andres Gomez-Lobo, 2017. "Estabilidad Macroeconómica y Crecimiento Económico: Mitos y Realidades," Working Papers wp457, University of Chile, Department of Economics.

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