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New York City Drunk Driving After Uber

Listed author(s):
  • Jessica Lynn Peck

    ()

    (Ph.D. Program in Economics, Graduate Center, CUNY)

This study investigates the effect of the introduction of Uber in New York City in May 2011 on drunk-driving. A difference-in-differences estimation of this effect implies a 25-35% decrease in the alcohol-related collision rate for the affected New York City boroughs, or about 40 collisions per month. With differentiated treatment effects for each effected county, the difference-in- differences effect is higher for Manhattan, average for the Bronx and Brooklyn, and lower for Queens. A synthetic control analysis shows pronounced effects over time in the Bronx and Brooklyn, and a permutation test confirms the effect is not commonly reproducible using untreated counties.

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File URL: http://wfs.gc.cuny.edu/Economics/RePEc/cgc/wpaper/CUNYGC-WP013.pdf
File Function: First version, January 2017
Download Restriction: no

Paper provided by City University of New York Graduate Center, Ph.D. Program in Economics in its series Working Papers with number 13.

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Length: 40
Date of creation: 13 Jan 2017
Handle: RePEc:cgc:wpaper:013
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  1. Thomas S Dee, 2001. "Does setting limits save lives? The case of 0.08 BAC laws," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 20(1), pages 111-128.
  2. Judd Cramer & Alan B. Krueger, 2016. "Disruptive Change in the Taxi Business: The Case of Uber," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 106(5), pages 177-182, May.
  3. Alberto Abadie & Javier Gardeazabal, 2003. "The Economic Costs of Conflict: A Case Study of the Basque Country," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 93(1), pages 113-132, March.
  4. Frechette, Guilaume & Lizzeri, Alessandro & Salz, Tobias, 2016. "Frictions in a Competitive, Regulated Market Evidence from Taxis," CEPR Discussion Papers 11626, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  5. Lovenheim, Michael F. & Slemrod, Joel, 2010. "The fatal toll of driving to drink: The effect of minimum legal drinking age evasion on traffic fatalities," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 29(1), pages 62-77, January.
  6. Henry S. Farber, 2005. "Is Tomorrow Another Day? The Labor Supply of New York City Cabdrivers," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 113(1), pages 46-82, February.
  7. Steven F. Kreft & Nancy M. Epling, 2007. "Do border crossings contribute to underage motor-vehicle fatalities? An analysis of Michigan border crossings," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 40(3), pages 765-781, August.
  8. Abadie, Alberto & Diamond, Alexis & Hainmueller, Jens, 2010. "Synthetic Control Methods for Comparative Case Studies: Estimating the Effect of California’s Tobacco Control Program," Journal of the American Statistical Association, American Statistical Association, vol. 105(490), pages 493-505.
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