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Politics, Policy Analysis, and the Passage of the National Minimum Drinking Age Act of 1984

  • Darren Grant

    ()

    (Department of Economics and International Business, Sam Houston State University)

The National Minimum Drinking Age Act of 1984 exemplifies high-stakes legislation that attracted the interest of the public, legislators, academics, policy advocates, and executive agencies. This paper explores how these actors combined to generate intellectual support for this act within the legislative process. Limitations of the contemporaneous research required that the available evidence be evaluated judiciously. This did not happen, because it is not fostered by the adversarial nature of the process and because its most influential participants, executive agencies heavily involved in traffic safety, lacked the necessary neutrality and expertise.

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File URL: http://www.shsu.edu/%7Etcq001/paper_files/wp11-03_paper.pdf
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Paper provided by Sam Houston State University, Department of Economics and International Business in its series Working Papers with number 1103.

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Date of creation: Sep 2011
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Handle: RePEc:shs:wpaper:1103
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  1. Chaloupka, Frank J & Saffer, Henry & Grossman, Michael, 1993. "Alcohol-Control Policies and Motor-Vehicle Fatalities," The Journal of Legal Studies, University of Chicago Press, vol. 22(1), pages 161-86, January.
  2. Miron, Jeffrey A. & Tetelbaum, Elina, 2009. "Does the Minimum Legal Drinking Age Save Lives?," Scholarly Articles 4319664, Harvard University Department of Economics.
  3. Dee, Thomas S., 1999. "State alcohol policies, teen drinking and traffic fatalities," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 72(2), pages 289-315, May.
  4. Thomas S Dee, 2001. "Does setting limits save lives? The case of 0.08 BAC laws," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 20(1), pages 111-128.
  5. Christopher Carpenter & Carlos Dobkin, 2009. "The Effect of Alcohol Consumption on Mortality: Regression Discontinuity Evidence from the Minimum Drinking Age," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 1(1), pages 164-82, January.
  6. Young, Douglas J. & Likens, Thomas W., 2000. "Alcohol Regulation and Auto Fatalities," International Review of Law and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 20(1), pages 107-126, March.
  7. Philip J. Cook & George Tauchen, 1984. "The Effect of Minimum Drinking Age Legislation on Youthful Auto Fatalities, 1970-1977," The Journal of Legal Studies, University of Chicago Press, vol. 13(1), pages 169-190, January.
  8. Henry Saffer & Michael Grossman, 1986. "Beer Taxes, the Legal Drinking Age, and Youth Motor Vehicle Fatalities," NBER Working Papers 1914, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  9. Daniel Eisenberg, 2003. "Evaluating the effectiveness of policies related to drunk driving," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 22(2), pages 249-274.
  10. Douglas J. Young & Agnieszka Bielinska-Kwapisz, 2006. "Alcohol Prices, Consumption, and Traffic Fatalities," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 72(3), pages 690-703, January.
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