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The Effect of Minimum Drinking Age Legislation on Youthful Auto Fatalities, 1970-1977


  • Philip J. Cook
  • George Tauchen


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  • Philip J. Cook & George Tauchen, 1984. "The Effect of Minimum Drinking Age Legislation on Youthful Auto Fatalities, 1970-1977," The Journal of Legal Studies, University of Chicago Press, vol. 13(1), pages 169-190, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:ucp:jlstud:v:13:y:1984:i:1:p:169-190

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Joseph L. Smith, 2007. "Presidents, Justices, and Deference to Administrative Action," Journal of Law, Economics, and Organization, Oxford University Press, vol. 23(2), pages 346-364, June.
    2. Matthew C. Stephenson, 2003. "“When the Devil Turns … †: The Political Foundations of Independent Judicial Review," The Journal of Legal Studies, University of Chicago Press, vol. 32(1), pages 59-89, January.
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    Cited by:

    1. Cook, Philip J. & Moore, Michael J., 2000. "Alcohol," Handbook of Health Economics,in: A. J. Culyer & J. P. Newhouse (ed.), Handbook of Health Economics, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 30, pages 1629-1673 Elsevier.
    2. Mark Gius, 2009. "Fuel Efficiency and the Determinants of Traffic Fatalities: A Comparison of Empirical Models," New York Economic Review, New York State Economics Association (NYSEA), pages 13-27.
    3. Guido W. Imbens & Jeffrey M. Wooldridge, 2009. "Recent Developments in the Econometrics of Program Evaluation," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 47(1), pages 5-86, March.
    4. Lewbel, Arthur & Yang, Thomas Tao, 2016. "Identifying the average treatment effect in ordered treatment models without unconfoundedness," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 195(1), pages 1-22.
    5. Chung Jinhwa & Joo Hailey Hayeon & Moon Seongman, 2014. "Designated Driver Service Availability and Its Effects on Drunk Driving Behaviors," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 14(4), pages 1-25, October.
    6. Benson, Bruce L. & Rasmussen, David W. & Mast, Brent D., 1999. "Deterring drunk driving fatalities: an economics of crime perspective1," International Review of Law and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(2), pages 205-225, June.
    7. Cook, Philip J. & Durrance, Christine Piette, 2013. "The virtuous tax: Lifesaving and crime-prevention effects of the 1991 federal alcohol-tax increase," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(1), pages 261-267.
    8. Corsaro, Nicholas & Gerard, Daniel W. & Engel, Robin S. & Eck, John E., 2012. "Not by accident: An analytical approach to traffic crash harm reduction," Journal of Criminal Justice, Elsevier, vol. 40(6), pages 502-514.
    9. Daniel Albalate, 2013. "The Road against Fatalities: Infrastructure Spending vs. Regulation?," ERSA conference papers ersa13p221, European Regional Science Association.
    10. Nabanita Datta Gupta & Anton Nielsson & Abdu Kedir Seid, 2017. "Short- and Long-Term Effects of Adolescent Alcohol Access: Evidence from Denmark," Economics Working Papers 2017-03, Department of Economics and Business Economics, Aarhus University.
    11. R. Kaestner, 2000. "A note on the effect of minimum drinking age laws on youth alcohol consumption," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 18(3), pages 315-325, July.
    12. Burkey, Mark L. & Obeng, Kofi, 2005. "Crash Risk Reduction at Signalized Intersections Using Longitudinal Data," MPRA Paper 36281, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    13. Darren Grant, 2011. "Politics, Policy Analysis, and the Passage of the National Minimum Drinking Age Act of 1984," Working Papers 1103, Sam Houston State University, Department of Economics and International Business.
    14. Daniel M. Hungerman, 2014. "Do Religious Proscriptions Matter?: Evidence from a Theory-Based Test," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 49(4), pages 1053-1093.
    15. Erik Nesson & Vinish Shrestha, 2016. "The Effects of False Identification Laws with a Scanner Provision on Underage Alcohol-Related Traffic Fatalities," Working Papers 2016-17, Towson University, Department of Economics, revised Oct 2016.
    16. Thomas S. Dee & William N. Evans, 2001. "Teens and Traffic Safety," NBER Chapters,in: Risky Behavior among Youths: An Economic Analysis, pages 121-166 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

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