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Estimation of Poverty Transition Matrices with Noisy Data

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  • Nayoung Lee
  • Geert Ridder
  • John Strauss

Abstract

This paper investigates potential measurement error biases in estimated poverty transition matrices. Transition matrices based on survey expenditure data has been compared to transition matrices based on measurement-error-free simulated expenditure. The simulation model uses estimates that correct for measurement error in expenditure. This dynamic model needs error-free initial conditions that can not be derived from these estimates. [Working Paper No. 270]
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  • Nayoung Lee & Geert Ridder & John Strauss, 2017. "Estimation of Poverty Transition Matrices with Noisy Data," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 32(1), pages 37-55, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:wly:japmet:v:32:y:2017:i:1:p:37-55
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    1. Francesco Devicienti & Valentina Gualtieri & Mariacristina Rossi, 2014. "The Persistence Of Income Poverty And Lifestyle Deprivation: Evidence From Italy," Bulletin of Economic Research, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 66(3), pages 246-278, July.
    2. Dang,Hai-Anh H. & Lanjouw,Peter F. & Swinkels,Robertus A & Dang,Hai-Anh H. & Lanjouw,Peter F. & Swinkels,Robertus A, 2014. "Who remained in poverty, who moved up, and who fell down ? an investigation of poverty dynamics in Senegal in the late 2000s," Policy Research Working Paper Series 7141, The World Bank.
    3. Dang, Hai-Anh & Lanjouw, Peter & Luoto, Jill & McKenzie, David, 2014. "Using repeated cross-sections to explore movements into and out of poverty," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 107(C), pages 112-128.
    4. Jolliffe,Dean Mitchell & Dang,Hai-Anh H. & Carletto,Calogero & Dang,Hai-Anh H. & Jolliffe,Dean Mitchell & Carletto,Calogero, 2017. "Data gaps, data incomparability, and data imputation : a review of poverty measurement methods for data-scarce environments," Policy Research Working Paper Series 8282, The World Bank.
    5. Garza-Rodriguez, Jorge & Fernández-Ramos, Jennifer & Garcia-Guerra, Ana K. & Morales-Ramirez, Gabriela, 2015. "The dynamics of poverty in Mexico: A multinomial logistic regression analysis," MPRA Paper 77743, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. Rocco Zizzamia & Simone Schotte & Murray Leibbrandt & Vimal Ranchhod, 2016. "Vulnerability and the Middle Class in South Africa," SALDRU Working Papers 188, Southern Africa Labour and Development Research Unit, University of Cape Town.

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