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The persistence of income poverty and life-style deprivation: Evidence from Italy

Author

Listed:
  • Francesco Devicienti

    () (University of Torino and Collegio Carlo Alberto)

  • Valentina Gualtieri

    (Institute for the Development of Vocational Training for Workers)

  • Mariacristina Rossi

    (University of Torino and Collegio Carlo Alberto)

Abstract

This article estimates poverty persistence over an individual's lifetime, using two definitions: income poverty and a multidimensional index of life-style deprivation. We stressed the ability of the two definitions to provide a generally consistent characterization of poverty persistence risks faced by various population subgroups, but also the additional insights to be gained by analyzing the two definitions in parallel in a longitudinal context. The results of multiple-spell hazard rate models highlight the weaknesses of the Italian labour market, the insufficiencies of the existing social security system and the deep territorial dualism in generating persistent poverty for certain groups of the population.

Suggested Citation

  • Francesco Devicienti & Valentina Gualtieri & Mariacristina Rossi, 2011. "The persistence of income poverty and life-style deprivation: Evidence from Italy," Working Papers 229, ECINEQ, Society for the Study of Economic Inequality.
  • Handle: RePEc:inq:inqwps:ecineq2011-229
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    File URL: http://www.ecineq.org/milano/WP/ECINEQ2011-229.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Iryna Kyzyma, 2014. "Changes in the Patterns of Poverty Duration in Germany, 1992–2009," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 60(S2), pages 305-331, November.
    2. KYZYMA Iryna, 2013. "Changes in the patterns of poverty duration in Germany, 1992-2009," LISER Working Paper Series 2013-06, LISER.
    3. Iryna Kyzyma & Donald R. Williams, 2017. "Public cash transfers and poverty dynamics in Europe," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 52(2), pages 485-524, March.
    4. Bina Gubhaju & Bryan Rodgers & Peter Butterworth & Lyndall Strazdins & Tanya Davidson, 2016. "Consistency and Continuity in Material and Psychosocial Adversity Among Australian Families with Young Children," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 128(1), pages 35-57, August.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Income poverty; multidimensional deprivation; poverty persistence; hazard-rate models; multiple spells.;

    JEL classification:

    • I32 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Measurement and Analysis of Poverty
    • C33 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models

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