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The persistence of income poverty and life-style deprivation: Evidence from Italy

  • Francesco Devicienti

    ()

    (University of Torino and Collegio Carlo Alberto)

  • Valentina Gualtieri

    (Institute for the Development of Vocational Training for Workers)

  • Mariacristina Rossi

    (University of Torino and Collegio Carlo Alberto)

This article estimates poverty persistence over an individual's lifetime, using two definitions: income poverty and a multidimensional index of life-style deprivation. We stressed the ability of the two definitions to provide a generally consistent characterization of poverty persistence risks faced by various population subgroups, but also the additional insights to be gained by analyzing the two definitions in parallel in a longitudinal context. The results of multiple-spell hazard rate models highlight the weaknesses of the Italian labour market, the insufficiencies of the existing social security system and the deep territorial dualism in generating persistent poverty for certain groups of the population.

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File URL: http://www.ecineq.org/milano/WP/ECINEQ2011-229.pdf
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Paper provided by ECINEQ, Society for the Study of Economic Inequality in its series Working Papers with number 229.

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Length: 55 pages
Date of creation: 2011
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:inq:inqwps:ecineq2011-229
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.ecineq.org
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  1. Muffels, Ruud & Fouarge, Didier, 2003. "The Role of European Welfare States in Explaining Resources Deprivation," MPRA Paper 13299, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  2. Aassve, Arnstein & Burgess, Simon & Dickson, Matt & Propper, Carol, 2005. "Modelling poverty by not modelling poverty: an application of a simultaneous hazards approach to the UK," ISER Working Paper Series 2005-26, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
  3. Lorenzo Cappellari & Stephen P. Jenkins, 2002. "Modelling Low Income Transitions," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 288, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
  4. Francesco Devicienti, 2002. "Poverty persistence in Britain: A multivariate analysis using the BHPS, 1991–1997," Journal of Economics, Springer, vol. 9(1), pages 307-340, December.
  5. Bruce D. Meyer, 1988. "Unemployment Insurance And Unemployment Spells," NBER Working Papers 2546, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. Ann Huff Stevens, 1999. "Climbing out of Poverty, Falling Back in: Measuring the Persistence of Poverty Over Multiple Spells," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 34(3), pages 557-588.
  7. Massimo Baldini & Stefano Toso & Paolo Bosi, 2002. "Targeting welfare in Italy: old problems and perspectives on reform," Fiscal Studies, Institute for Fiscal Studies, vol. 23(1), pages 51-75, March.
  8. Francesco Devicienti, 2011. "Estimating poverty persistence in Britain," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 40(3), pages 657-686, May.
  9. Christopher Whelan & Bertrand Maître, 2006. "Comparing poverty and deprivation dynamics: Issues of reliability and validity," Journal of Economic Inequality, Springer, vol. 4(3), pages 303-323, December.
  10. Franco Peracchi, 2002. "The European Community Household Panel: A review," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 27(1), pages 63-90.
  11. Sarah Jarvis & Stephen P. Jenkins, 1997. "Low income dynamics in 1990s Britain," Fiscal Studies, Institute for Fiscal Studies, vol. 18(2), pages 123-142, May.
  12. Andrea Brandolini & Piero Cipollone & Paolo Sestito, 2001. "Earnings Dispersion, Low Pay and Household Poverty in Italy, 1977-1998," Temi di discussione (Economic working papers) 427, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
  13. Heckman, James & Singer, Burton, 1984. "A Method for Minimizing the Impact of Distributional Assumptions in Econometric Models for Duration Data," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 52(2), pages 271-320, March.
  14. Joseph Deutsch & Jacques Silber, 2005. "Measuring Multidimensional Poverty: An Empirical Comparison Of Various Approaches," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 51(1), pages 145-174, 03.
  15. Mary Jo Bane & David T. Ellwood, 1986. "Slipping into and out of Poverty: The Dynamics of Spells," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 21(1), pages 1-23.
  16. Anna Giraldo & Enrico Rettore & Ugo Trivellato, 2002. "The persistence of poverty: true state dependence or unobserved heterogeneity? Some evidence from the Italian Survey on Household Income and Wealth," 10th International Conference on Panel Data, Berlin, July 5-6, 2002 B2-1, International Conferences on Panel Data.
  17. Olga Cantó, 2003. "Finding out the Routes to Escape Poverty: The Relevance of Demographic vs. Labor Market Events in Spain," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 49(4), pages 569-588, December.
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