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Poverty persistence in Britain: a multivariate analysis using the BHPS, 1991-1997

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  • Devicienti, Francesco

Abstract

This paper uses longitudinal data from the BHPS, waves 1-7, to document low-income dynamics for individuals living in Britain in 1990s. Poverty entry and exit hazard rates are estimated and used to calculate the distribution of time spent poor over a six-year period. The results underline the importance of accounting for individuals' repeated spells of poverty when measuring poverty persistence. Using discrete-time proportional hazard rate models, the paper then seeks to 'explain' and forecast the observed chances of exit/entering poverty and the distribution of time spent in poverty for individuals with selected characteristics. The socio-economic correlates of the observed poverty patterns are investigated, including the relative importance of both household and individual characteristics.

Suggested Citation

  • Devicienti, Francesco, 2001. "Poverty persistence in Britain: a multivariate analysis using the BHPS, 1991-1997," ISER Working Paper Series 2001-02, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:ese:iserwp:2001-02
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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • I32 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Measurement and Analysis of Poverty
    • I31 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - General Welfare, Well-Being

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