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Poverty persistence in Britain: a multivariate analysis using the BHPS, 1991-1997

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  • Devicienti, Francesco

Abstract

This paper uses longitudinal data from the BHPS, waves 1-7, to document low-income dynamics for individuals living in Britain in 1990s. Poverty entry and exit hazard rates are estimated and used to calculate the distribution of time spent poor over a six-year period. The results underline the importance of accounting for individuals' repeated spells of poverty when measuring poverty persistence. Using discrete-time proportional hazard rate models, the paper then seeks to 'explain' and forecast the observed chances of exit/entering poverty and the distribution of time spent in poverty for individuals with selected characteristics. The socio-economic correlates of the observed poverty patterns are investigated, including the relative importance of both household and individual characteristics.

Suggested Citation

  • Devicienti, Francesco, 2001. "Poverty persistence in Britain: a multivariate analysis using the BHPS, 1991-1997," ISER Working Paper Series 2001-02, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:ese:iserwp:2001-02
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    Cited by:

    1. Dávila Quintana, C. Delia & Malo, Miguel A., 2012. "Poverty dynamics and disability: An empirical exercise using the European community household panel," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 41(4), pages 350-359.
    2. repec:taf:jpolrf:v:20:y:2017:i:2:p:136-164 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Francesco Devicienti & Valentina Gualtieri & Mariacristina Rossi, 2014. "The Persistence Of Income Poverty And Lifestyle Deprivation: Evidence From Italy," Bulletin of Economic Research, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 66(3), pages 246-278, July.
    4. Francesco Devicienti, 2011. "Estimating poverty persistence in Britain," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 40(3), pages 657-686, May.
    5. Iryna Kyzyma, 2014. "Changes in the Patterns of Poverty Duration in Germany, 1992–2009," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 60(S2), pages 305-331, November.
    6. Thomas, Anne-Claire & Gaspart, Frédéric, 2015. "Does Poverty Trap Rural Malagasy Households?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 67(C), pages 490-505.
    7. Marjan, MAES, 2008. "Poverty persistence among Belgian elderly in the transition from work to retirement : an empirical analysis," Discussion Papers (ECON - Département des Sciences Economiques) 2008042, Université catholique de Louvain, Département des Sciences Economiques.
    8. Aysenur Acar & Cem Baslevent, 2014. "Examination of the Transitions of Households into and out of Poverty in Turkey," Working Papers 015, Bahcesehir University, Betam.
    9. Natalia Nehrebecka & Agata Kocia, 2009. "Analysis of poverty in Poland in 1997 - 2000 using hazard models," Working Papers 2009-09, Faculty of Economic Sciences, University of Warsaw.
    10. Lori J. Curtis & Kate Rybczynski, 2014. "Exiting Poverty: Does Sex Matter?," Canadian Public Policy, University of Toronto Press, vol. 40(2), pages 126-142, June.
    11. Iryna Kyzyma & Donald R. Williams, 2017. "Public cash transfers and poverty dynamics in Europe," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 52(2), pages 485-524, March.
    12. Eirini Andriopoulou & Panagiotis Tsakloglou, "undated". "The determinants of poverty transitions in Europe and the role of duration dependence," DEOS Working Papers 1120, Athens University of Economics and Business.
    13. Jesus Perez-Mayo, 2005. "Identifying deprivation profiles in Spain: a new approach," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 37(8), pages 943-955.
    14. Goebel, Jan & Kuchler, Birgit, 2003. "Incidence and Intensity of Smoothed Income Poverty in European Countries," EconStor Open Access Articles, ZBW - German National Library of Economics, pages 357-369.
    15. Katsushi S. Imai & Jing You, 2011. "Poverty Dynamics of Households in Rural China: Identifying Multiple Pathways for Poverty Transition," Discussion Paper Series DP2011-35, Research Institute for Economics & Business Administration, Kobe University.
    16. Francesco Devicienti & Ambra Poggi, 2011. "Poverty and social exclusion: two sides of the same coin or dynamically interrelated processes?," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 43(25), pages 3549-3571.
    17. Massimo Baldini & Giovanni Gallo & Manuel Reverberi & Andrea Trapani, 2016. "Social transfers and poverty in Europe: comparing social exclusion and targeting across welfare regimes," Department of Economics 0091, University of Modena and Reggio E., Faculty of Economics "Marco Biagi".
    18. Coral del Río & Carlos Gradín & Olga Cantó, 2006. "What helps households with children in leaving poverty? Evidence from Spain," Working Papers 24, ECINEQ, Society for the Study of Economic Inequality.
    19. Massimo Baldini & Giovanni Gallo & Manuel Reverberi & Andrea Trapani, 2016. "Social transfers and poverty in Europe: comparing social exclusion and targeting across welfare regimes," Center for the Analysis of Public Policies (CAPP) 0145, Universita di Modena e Reggio Emilia, Dipartimento di Economia "Marco Biagi".
    20. Islam, Nizamul & Shimeles, Abebe, 2007. "Poverty dynamics in Ethiopia: state dependence," Working Papers in Economics 260, University of Gothenburg, Department of Economics.
    21. Katsushi S. Imai & Jing You, 2014. "Poverty Dynamics of Households in Rural China," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 76(6), pages 898-923, December.
    22. Ayala, Luis & Navarro, Carolina, 2007. "The dynamics of housing deprivation," Journal of Housing Economics, Elsevier, vol. 16(1), pages 72-97, March.
    23. Maes, Marjan, 2008. "Poverty persistence among Belgian elderly: true or spurious?," ISER Working Paper Series 2008-24, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    24. FAYE Ousmane & ISLAM Nizamul & ZULU Eliya, 2011. "Poverty dynamics in Nairobi's slums: testing for true state dependence and heterogeneity effects," LISER Working Paper Series 2011-56, LISER.
    25. Daouli, Joan & Davillas, Apostolos & Demoussis, Michael & Giannakopoulos, Nicholas, 2014. "Obesity persistence and duration dependence: Evidence from a cohort of US adults (1985–2010)," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 12(C), pages 30-44.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • I32 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Measurement and Analysis of Poverty
    • I31 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - General Welfare, Well-Being

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