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Understanding poverty persistence in Spain

  • Sara Ayllón

    ()

The aim of this paper is to study the mechanisms behind poverty persistence in Spain. We examine the importance of past poverty experiences for explaining current poverty as opposed to observed and unobserved individual heterogeneity. Our results are based on the model proposed by Cappellari and Jenkins (J Appl Econometr 19:593–610, 2004a ) that estimates poverty transitions while simultaneously controlling for attrition and initial conditions. We find that about 50% of aggregate state dependence is genuine: poverty in a given year increases in itself the chances of experiencing poverty again in the future. The remainder is explained, among other characteristics, by living with a head of household who has no educational qualifications, being an immigrant or cohabiting with teenagers. Our findings call for a comprehensive and coordinated strategy against poverty that should focus equally on income-support policies and on enhancing those characteristics that best protect against economic hardship. From a methodological point of view, we learn that unobservables affecting initial conditions and sample retention are exogenous to those related to poverty transience. However, results prove to be sensitive to the choice of poverty line. Copyright The Author(s) 2013

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File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s13209-012-0089-4
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Article provided by Spanish Economic Association in its journal SERIEs.

Volume (Year): 4 (2013)
Issue (Month): 2 (June)
Pages: 201-233

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Handle: RePEc:spr:series:v:4:y:2013:i:2:p:201-233
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  1. Ambra Poggi, 2003. "Does persistence of social exclusion exist in Spain?," Working Papers wpdea0308, Department of Applied Economics at Universitat Autonoma of Barcelona.
  2. Lorenzo Cappellari & Stephen P. Jenkins, 2006. "Calculation of Multivariate Normal Probabilities by Simulation, with Applications to Maximum Simulated Likelihood Estimation," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 584, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
  3. Lillard, Lee A & Willis, Robert J, 1978. "Dynamic Aspects of Earning Mobility," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 46(5), pages 985-1012, September.
  4. Buddelmeyer, Hielke & Verick, Sher, 2007. "Understanding the Drivers of Poverty Dynamics in Australian Households," IZA Discussion Papers 2827, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  5. Martin Biewen, 2005. "The Covariance Structure of East and West German Incomes and its Implications for the Persistence of Poverty and Inequality," German Economic Review, Verein für Socialpolitik, vol. 6(4), pages 445-469, November.
  6. Martin Biewen, 2009. "Measuring state dependence in individual poverty histories when there is feedback to employment status and household composition," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 24(7), pages 1095-1116.
  7. Jenkins, Stephen P., 2011. "Changing Fortunes: Income Mobility and Poverty Dynamics in Britain," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780199226436.
  8. Luis Ayala & Carolina Navarro & Mercedes Sastre, . "Cross-Country Income Mobility Comparisons Under Panel Attrition: The Relevance Of Weighting Schemes," Working Papers 19-06 Classification-JEL , Instituto de Estudios Fiscales.
  9. Stewart, Mark B & Swaffield, Joanna K, 1999. "Low Pay Dynamics and Transition Probabilities," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 66(261), pages 23-42, February.
  10. Arnstein Aassve & Simon Burgess & Matt Dickson & Carol Propper, 2006. "Modelling poverty by not modelling poverty: An application of a simultaneous hazards approach to the UK," CASE Papers case106, Centre for Analysis of Social Exclusion, LSE.
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  12. William Nilsson, 2012. "Heterogeneity Or True State Dependence In Poverty: The Tale Told By Twins," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 58(1), pages 1-23, 03.
  13. Arulampalam, Wiji & Booth, Alison L & Taylor, Mark P, 2000. "Unemployment Persistence," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 52(1), pages 24-50, January.
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  16. Jeffrey M Wooldridge, 2002. "Simple solutions to the initial conditions problem in dynamic, nonlinear panel data models with unobserved heterogeneity," CeMMAP working papers CWP18/02, Centre for Microdata Methods and Practice, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
  17. Lorenzo Cappellari & Stephen P. Jenkins, 2003. "Multivariate probit regression using simulated maximum likelihood," United Kingdom Stata Users' Group Meetings 2003 10, Stata Users Group.
  18. FUSCO Alessio & ISLAM Nizamul, 2012. "Understanding the drivers of low income transitions in Luxembourg," CEPS/INSTEAD Working Paper Series 2012-31, CEPS/INSTEAD.
  19. Lorenzo Cappellari & Stephen P. Jemkins, 2002. "Who Stays Poor? Who Becomes Poor? Evidence from the British Household Panel Survey," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 112(478), pages C60-C67, March.
  20. Mary Jo Bane & David T. Ellwood, 1986. "Slipping into and out of Poverty: The Dynamics of Spells," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 21(1), pages 1-23.
  21. Mark B. Stewart, 2007. "The interrelated dynamics of unemployment and low-wage employment," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 22(3), pages 511-531.
  22. FAYE Ousmane & ISLAM Nizamul & ZULU Eliya, 2011. "Poverty dynamics in Nairobi's slums: testing for true state dependence and heterogeneity effects," CEPS/INSTEAD Working Paper Series 2011-56, CEPS/INSTEAD.
  23. Annelies Debels & Leen Vandecasteele, 2008. "The Time Lag In Annual Household-Based Income Measures: Assessing And Correcting The Bias," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 54(1), pages 71-88, 03.
  24. Cheti Nicoletti & Franco Peracchi, 2005. "Survey response and survey characteristics: microlevel evidence from the European Community Household Panel," Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series A, Royal Statistical Society, vol. 168(4), pages 763-781.
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