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Youth Poverty, Employment, and Leaving the Parental Home in Europe

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  • Sara Ayllón

Abstract

type="main"> This paper studies the nature of youth poverty dynamics in Europe. First, it analyzes to what extent experiencing poverty in a given period is in itself positively related to the probability of living below the poverty line again in the future. That is, we assess the degree of poverty genuine state dependence among young people. Second, we study the interrelationships between poverty, employment, and residential emancipation. The results show that youth poverty genuine state dependence is positive and highly significant, but this scarring effect is short-lived in Scandinavia compared to Southern or Continental Europe. Moreover, although we find a strong association between poverty and leaving home in Nordic countries, time spent in economic hardship does not last long. On the contrary, in Spain and Italy, young adults tend to leave their parental home much later in order to avoid falling into a poverty state that is more persistent.

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  • Sara Ayllón, 2015. "Youth Poverty, Employment, and Leaving the Parental Home in Europe," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 61(4), pages 651-676, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:revinw:v:61:y:2015:i:4:p:651-676
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1111/roiw.12122
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    Cited by:

    1. Yekaterina Chzhen & Emilia Toczydlowska & Sudhanshu Handa & UNICEF Innocenti Research Centre, 2016. "Child Poverty Dynamics and Income Mobility in Europe," Papers inwopa840, Innocenti Working Papers.

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