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Leaving Home and the Chances of Being Poor: The Case of Young People in Southern European Countries

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  • Lavinia Parisi

Abstract

This paper analyses, for southern European countries (Italy, Spain, Greece, and Portugal), the link between the poverty status of young people who leave home and the economic status of their family of origin. First we model the poverty status of those who leave home while also accounting for the fact that youths from better-off households are more likely to leave home (a sample selection model). Second we address the time at risk of leaving home using a competing risks duration model. Estimates from both approaches suggest that young people delay leaving home because it may increase their chances of being poor. Moreover both approaches indicate that young people who have left home are more likely to be poor if their family of origin is poor and that differences across countries are not statistically significant. Copyright 2008 The Author. Journal compilation CEIS, Fondazione Giacomo Brodolini and Blackwell Publishing Ltd. 2008.

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  • Lavinia Parisi, 2008. "Leaving Home and the Chances of Being Poor: The Case of Young People in Southern European Countries," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 22(s1), pages 89-114, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:labour:v:22:y:2008:i:s1:p:89-114
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    1. Aassve, Arnstein & Iacovou, Maria & Mencarini, Letizia, 2005. "Youth poverty in Europe: what do we know?," ISER Working Paper Series 2005-02, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    2. Olga CantÛ-S·nchez & Magda Mercader-Prats, "undated". "Poverty among children and youth in Spain: The role of parents and youth employment status," Studies on the Spanish Economy 46, FEDEA.
    3. Francis Vella, 1998. "Estimating Models with Sample Selection Bias: A Survey," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 33(1), pages 127-169.
    4. Iacovou, Maria, 2001. "Leaving home in the European Union," ISER Working Paper Series 2001-18, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    5. Aassve, Arnstein & Davia, Maria A. & Iacovou, Maria, 2005. "Does leaving home make you poor? Evidence from 13 European countries," ISER Working Paper Series 2005-24, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    6. Arnstein Aassve & Maria Iacovou & Letizia Mencarini, 2006. "Youth poverty and transition to adulthood in Europe," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 15(2), pages 21-50, July.
    7. Marco Manacorda & Enrico Moretti, 2006. "Why do Most Italian Youths Live with Their Parents? Intergenerational Transfers and Household Structure," Journal of the European Economic Association, MIT Press, vol. 4(4), pages 800-829, June.
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    Cited by:

    1. Maria Chiuri & Daniela Del Boca, 2010. "Home-leaving decisions of daughters and sons," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 8(3), pages 393-408, September.
    2. David C. Ribar, 2015. "Is Leaving Home a Hardship?," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 81(3), pages 598-618, January.
    3. MAZZOTTA, Fernanda & PARISI, Lavinia, 2017. "What are the Role of Economic Factors in Determining Leaving and Returning to the Parental Home in Europe During the Crisis? Technical Details," CELPE Discussion Papers 151, CELPE - Centre of Labour Economics and Economic Policy, University of Salerno, Italy.
    4. Sara Ayllón, 2009. "Poverty and living arrangements among youth in Spain, 1980-2005," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 20(17), pages 403-434, April.
    5. Sawako Shirahase, 2009. "Delay in Marriage and Income Inequality in Japan: The Impact of the Increased Number of Unmarried Adults Living with Their Parents on the Household Economy," LIS Working papers 510, LIS Cross-National Data Center in Luxembourg.
    6. Ayllón, Sara, 2009. "Modelling state dependence and feedback effects between poverty, employment and parental home emancipation among European youth," Working Papers 10, VATT Institute for Economic Research.
    7. Maria Concetta Chiuri & Daniela Del Boca, 2010. "Household Membership Decisions of Adult Children: Exploring European Diversity," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 24(s1), pages 3-24, December.
    8. Fernanda Mazzotta & Lavinia Parisi, 2015. "The effect of Employment on Leaving Home in Italy," Discussion Papers 8_2015, CRISEI, University of Naples "Parthenope", Italy.
    9. Tindara Addabbo & Randi Kjeldstad, 2012. "Household affiliation among young adult women and men in Italy and Norway: The significance of work, culture, and money," Department of Economics (DEMB) 0005, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Department of Economics "Marco Biagi".
    10. Sawako Shirahase, 2009. "Delay in Marriage and Income Inequality in Japan: The Impact of the Increased Number of Unmarried Adults Living with Their Parents on the Household Economy," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 190, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
    11. Cecilia Albert Verdú & María A. Davia Rodríguez, 2009. "Monetary poverty, education exclusion and material deprivation amongst youth in Spain," Alcamentos 0903, Universidad de Alcalá, Departamento de Economía..
    12. Sara Ayllón, 2015. "Youth Poverty, Employment, and Leaving the Parental Home in Europe," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 61(4), pages 651-676, December.

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