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Household structure in the EU


  • Iacovou, Maria
  • Skew, Alexandra J.


This paper maps key indicators of household structure across all countries for all countries of the expanded European Union except Malta. As well as presenting statistics which take the entire household as the unit of analysis, we also focus on groups which are particularly interesting in terms of social policy, and for whom household composition may be particularly crucial in terms of their risk of poverty: children, young adults and elderly people. A main aim of the paper is to discuss the extent to which the new EU member states of Eastern Europe display differences and similarities with the other countries of the EU. We find that the Eastern European countries are rather heterogeneous. The Czech Republic and Hungary are not dissimilar to the countries of North-Western Europe; by contrast, households in Slovenia, Slovakia and Poland closely resemble Southern European households. Finally, it is the Baltic states - particularly Latvia - where household structure least resembles structures in any of the pre-enlargement EU countries.

Suggested Citation

  • Iacovou, Maria & Skew, Alexandra J., 2010. "Household structure in the EU," ISER Working Paper Series 2010-10, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:ese:iserwp:2010-10

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Rendall, Michael S & Speare, Alden, Jr, 1995. "Elderly Poverty Alleviation through Living with Family," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 8(4), pages 383-405, November.
    2. Marco Manacorda & Enrico Moretti, 2006. "Why do Most Italian Youths Live with Their Parents? Intergenerational Transfers and Household Structure," Journal of the European Economic Association, MIT Press, vol. 4(4), pages 800-829, June.
    3. Mary Jo Bane & David T. Ellwood, 1986. "Slipping into and out of Poverty: The Dynamics of Spells," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 21(1), pages 1-23.
    4. Tineke Fokkema & Aart C. Liefbroer, 2008. "Trends in living arrangements in Europe: Convergence or divergence?," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 19(36), pages 1351-1418, July.
    5. Alessandro Rosina & Romina Fraboni, 2004. "Is marriage losing its centrality in Italy?," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 11(6), pages 149-172, September.
    6. Aassve, Arnstein & Davia, Maria A. & Iacovou, Maria, 2005. "Does leaving home make you poor? Evidence from 13 European countries," ISER Working Paper Series 2005-24, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    7. Scott Boggess, 1998. "Family structure, economic status, and educational attainment," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 11(2), pages 205-222.
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    Cited by:

    1. Irena Kotowska & Janina Jóźwiak, 2012. "Nowa demografia Europy a rodzina," Collegium of Economic Analysis Annals, Warsaw School of Economics, Collegium of Economic Analysis, issue 28, pages 9-33.
    2. Asai, Yukiko & Kambayashi, Ryo & Yamaguchi, Shintaro, 2015. "Crowding-Out Effect of Publicly Provided Childcare: Why Maternal Employment Did Not Increase," Discussion Paper Series 626, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.
    3. Maria Iacovou & Alexandra J. Skew, 2011. "Household composition across the new Europe: Where do the new Member States fit in?," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 25(14), pages 465-490, August.
    4. Sabina Alkire and Mauricio Apablaza, 2016. "Multidimensional Poverty in Europe 2006–2012: Illustrating a Methodology," OPHI Working Papers ophiwp074, Queen Elizabeth House, University of Oxford.
    5. Timo Hener & Helmut Rainer & Thomas Siedler, 2016. "Political socialization in flux?: linking family non-intactness during childhood to adult civic engagement," Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series A, Royal Statistical Society, vol. 179(3), pages 633-656, June.
    6. Natasha Pilkauskas & Melissa Martinson, 2014. "Three-generation family households in early childhood: Comparisons between the United States, the United Kingdom, and Australia," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 30(60), pages 1639-1652, May.
    7. Asai, Yukiko & Kambayashi, Ryo & Yamaguchi, Shintaro, 2015. "Childcare availability, household structure, and maternal employment," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 38(C), pages 172-192.
    8. Astrid Würtz Rasmussen & Leslie S. Stratton, 2016. "How distance to a non-resident parent relates to child outcomes," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 14(4), pages 829-857, December.
    9. Anna Baranowska, 2011. "Trash contracts? The impact of temporary employment on leaving the parental home in Poland," Working Papers 44, Institute of Statistics and Demography, Warsaw School of Economics.
    10. Carole Bonnet & Olivier Bontout & Anne-Juliette Lecourt, 2014. "Une décomposition des différences de niveaux de vie des actifs et des retraités en Europe," Économie et Statistique, Programme National Persée, vol. 469(1), pages 121-146.
    11. Anna Garriga & Sebastià Sarasa & Paolo Berta, 2015. "Mother’s educational level and single motherhood: Comparing Spain and Italy," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 33(42), pages 1165-1210, December.

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