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Youth poverty and transition to adulthood in Europe

Author

Listed:
  • Arnstein Aassve

    (Università Commerciale Luigi Bocconi)

  • Maria Iacovou

    (University of Essex)

  • Letizia Mencarini

    (Bocconi University)

Abstract

There is an increasing amount of research focussing on the transition to adulthood, a stage of the life cycle where young people face demanding life decisions, including completion of education, finding stable employment, and establishing their household and family. Whereas there is a well-developed literature on poverty among households in general, very little research has focused on poverty among young adults. Using the European Community Household Panel (ECHP) we provide a detailed description of youth poverty in Europe. Across the European Union youth poverty varies greatly, being higher in Southern European countries, as well as in the ‘liberal’ regimes of the UK and Ireland. However, there are also large variations in the extent of youth poverty within countries, between what we might term "younger youth" (aged 16-19) and "older youth" aged (25-29). In the UK, poverty rates among "younger youth" are much higher than among "older youth", suggesting that poverty among young people is closely associated with child poverty. In the Scandinavian countries, poverty peaks dramatically in the early twenties, indicating that in these countries, poverty is associated with leaving home.

Suggested Citation

  • Arnstein Aassve & Maria Iacovou & Letizia Mencarini, 2006. "Youth poverty and transition to adulthood in Europe," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 15(2), pages 21-50, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:dem:demres:v:15:y:2006:i:2
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    File URL: https://www.demographic-research.org/volumes/vol15/2/15-2.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Chen, Wen-Hao & Corak, Miles, 2005. "Child Poverty and Changes in Child Poverty in Rich Countries Since 1990," IZA Discussion Papers 1574, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    2. Olga CantÛ-S·nchez & Magda Mercader-Prats, "undated". "Poverty among children and youth in Spain: The role of parents and youth employment status," Studies on the Spanish Economy 46, FEDEA.
    3. Robson, Karen & Berthoud, Richard, 2003. "Early motherhood and disadvantage: a comparison between ethnic groups," ISER Working Paper Series 2003-29, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    4. Irwin Garfinkel & Lee Rainwater & Timothy M. Smeeding, 2004. "Welfare State Expenditures and the Distribution of Child Opportunities," Center for Policy Research Working Papers 63, Center for Policy Research, Maxwell School, Syracuse University.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Maria Chiuri & Daniela Del Boca, 2010. "Home-leaving decisions of daughters and sons," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 8(3), pages 393-408, September.
    2. Laura Cavalli & Alessandro Bucciol & Paolo Pertile & Veronica Polin & Nicola Sartor & Alessandro Sommacal, 2012. "Modelling life-course decisions for the analysis of interpersonal and intrapersonal redistribution," Working Papers 25/2012, University of Verona, Department of Economics.
    3. Maria Sironi, 2017. "Economic Conditions of Young Adults Before and After the Great Recession," LIS Working papers 716, LIS Cross-National Data Center in Luxembourg.
    4. repec:kap:jfamec:v:39:y:2018:i:1:d:10.1007_s10834-017-9554-3 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Arnstein Aassve & Elena Cottini & Agnese Vitali, 2013. "Youth prospects in a time of economic recession," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 29(36), pages 949-962, November.
    6. A. Busetta & A. Milito, 2010. "Socio-Demographic Vulnerability: The Condition of Italian Young People," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 97(3), pages 375-396, July.
    7. Antonella D’Agostino & Andrea Regoli, 2013. "Life Conditions and Opportunities of Young Adults: Evidence from Italy in European Comparative Perspective," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 113(3), pages 1205-1235, September.
    8. Sara Ayllón, 2009. "Poverty and living arrangements among youth in Spain, 1980-2005," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 20(17), pages 403-434, April.
    9. Sawako Shirahase, 2009. "Delay in Marriage and Income Inequality in Japan: The Impact of the Increased Number of Unmarried Adults Living with Their Parents on the Household Economy," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 190, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
    10. Arnstein Aassve & Alice Goisis & Maria Sironi, 2012. "Happiness and Childbearing Across Europe," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 108(1), pages 65-86, August.
    11. Maria Concetta Chiuri & Daniela Del Boca, 2008. "Household Membership Decisions of Adult Children: Does Gender and Institutions Matter?," Carlo Alberto Notebooks 75, Collegio Carlo Alberto.
    12. Chiuri, Maria Concetta & Del Boca, Daniela, 2008. "Household Membership Decisions of Adult Children," IZA Discussion Papers 3546, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    13. Sawako Shirahase, 2009. "Delay in Marriage and Income Inequality in Japan: The Impact of the Increased Number of Unmarried Adults Living with Their Parents on the Household Economy," LIS Working papers 510, LIS Cross-National Data Center in Luxembourg.
    14. Sara Ayllón, 2015. "Youth Poverty, Employment, and Leaving the Parental Home in Europe," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 61(4), pages 651-676, December.
    15. Ayllón, Sara, 2009. "Modelling state dependence and feedback effects between poverty, employment and parental home emancipation among European youth," Working Papers 10, VATT Institute for Economic Research.
    16. Maria Concetta Chiuri & Daniela Del Boca, 2007. "Living arrangements in Europe: exploring gender differences and institutional characteristics," CHILD Working Papers wp24_07, CHILD - Centre for Household, Income, Labour and Demographic economics - ITALY.
    17. Lavinia Parisi, 2008. "Leaving Home and the Chances of Being Poor: The Case of Young People in Southern European Countries," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 22(s1), pages 89-114, June.
    18. Mendola, Daria & Busetta, Annalisa & Aassve, Arnstein, 2008. "Poverty permanence among European youth," ISER Working Paper Series 2008-04, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    19. Arnstein Aassve & Elena Cottini & Agnese Vitali, 2013. "Youth Vulnerability in Europe during the Great Recession," Working Papers 057, "Carlo F. Dondena" Centre for Research on Social Dynamics (DONDENA), Università Commerciale Luigi Bocconi.
    20. Maria Concetta Chiuri & Daniela Del Boca, 2010. "Household Membership Decisions of Adult Children: Exploring European Diversity," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 24(s1), pages 3-24, December.
    21. Aassve, Arnstein & Davia, Maria A. & Iacovou, Maria, 2005. "Does leaving home make you poor? Evidence from 13 European countries," ISER Working Paper Series 2005-24, Institute for Social and Economic Research.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    European Community Household Panel (ECHP); living arrangements; poverty; transition to adulthood; welfare regimes; youth;

    JEL classification:

    • J1 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics
    • Z0 - Other Special Topics - - General

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