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Home-leaving decisions of daughters and sons

Author

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  • Maria Chiuri
  • Daniela Del Boca

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Abstract

In spite of relevant differences between countries, a common international pattern emerges: daughters leave parental homes earlier than sons. Drawing upon the European Community Household Panel, we explore the impacts of various factors that affect daughters' and sons' home-leaving decisions. Our results show important differences across genders as well as across countries. The decisions of daughters appear to be more responsive than sons' to family structure as well as to institutional factors such as the labor and the mortgage market.
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Suggested Citation

  • Maria Chiuri & Daniela Del Boca, 2010. "Home-leaving decisions of daughters and sons," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 8(3), pages 393-408, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:reveho:v:8:y:2010:i:3:p:393-408
    DOI: 10.1007/s11150-010-9093-2
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    Cited by:

    1. Roberto Impicciatore, 2015. "The Transition to Adulthood of the Italian Second Generation in France," European Journal of Population, Springer;European Association for Population Studies, vol. 31(5), pages 529-560, December.
    2. Emily E. Wiemers, 2017. "The Celtic Tiger and home leaving among Irish young adults," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 15(1), pages 199-222, March.
    3. Aparicio Fenoll, Ainhoa & Oppedisano, Veruska, 2012. "Fostering the Emancipation of Young People: Evidence from a Spanish Rental Subsidy," IZA Discussion Papers 6651, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    4. Juliet Stone & Ann Berrington & Jane Falkingham, 2014. "Gender, Turning Points, and Boomerangs: Returning Home in Young Adulthood in Great Britain," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 51(1), pages 257-276, February.
    5. Tindara Addabbo & Randi Kjeldstad, 2013. "Household affiliation of young adults in Italy and Norway. The significance of gender, sociocultural background, work and money," Discussion Papers 752, Statistics Norway, Research Department.
    6. Katrine Løken & Kjell Lommerud & Shelly Lundberg, 2013. "Your Place or Mine? On the Residence Choice of Young Couples in Norway," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 50(1), pages 285-310, February.
    7. Ronald R. Rindfuss & Minja Kim Choe & Sarah R. Brauner-Otto, 2016. "The Emergence of Two Distinct Fertility Regimes in Economically Advanced Countries," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer;Southern Demographic Association (SDA), vol. 35(3), pages 287-304, June.
    8. Patacchini, Eleonora & Arduini, Tiziano, 2016. "Residential choices of young Americans," Journal of Housing Economics, Elsevier, vol. 34(C), pages 69-81.
    9. repec:dem:demres:v:37:y:2017:i:63 is not listed on IDEAS
    10. Adamopoulou, Effrosyni & Kaya, Ezgi, 2013. "Young adults living with their parents and the influence of peers," UC3M Working papers. Economics we1310, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid. Departamento de Economía.
    11. Adamopoulou, Effrosyni, 2016. "Living Arrangements of the Youth: Determinants and Gender Differences/Patrones de convivencia de los jóvenes: Determinantes y diferencias por sexos," Estudios de Economía Aplicada, Estudios de Economía Aplicada, vol. 34, pages 35-44, Enero.
    12. Namkee Ahn & Virginia Sánchez-Marcos, 2017. "Emancipation under the great recession in Spain," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 15(2), pages 477-495, June.
    13. Maria Concetta Chiuri & Daniela Del Boca, 2010. "Household Membership Decisions of Adult Children: Exploring European Diversity," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 24(s1), pages 3-24, December.
    14. Giulia Ferrari & Alessandro Rosina & Emiliano Sironi, 2014. "Beyond Good Intentions: The Decision-Making Process of Leaving the Family of Origin in Italy," Working Papers 060, "Carlo F. Dondena" Centre for Research on Social Dynamics (DONDENA), Università Commerciale Luigi Bocconi.
    15. Luca Stella, 2017. "Living arrangements in Europe: whether and why paternal retirement matters," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 15(2), pages 497-525, June.
    16. Laura Cavalli & Alessandro Bucciol & Paolo Pertile & Veronica Polin & Nicola Sartor & Alessandro Sommacal, 2012. "Modelling life-course decisions for the analysis of interpersonal and intrapersonal redistribution," Working Papers 25/2012, University of Verona, Department of Economics.
    17. Rebekka Christopoulou, Maria Pantalidou & Maria Pantalidou, 2018. "The parental home as labour market insurance for young Greeks during the crisis," GreeSE – Hellenic Observatory Papers on Greece and Southeast Europe 122, Hellenic Observatory, LSE.
    18. Christopoulou, Rebekka & Pantalidou, Maria, 2017. "The parental home as labor market insurance for young Greeks during the crisis," GLO Discussion Paper Series 158, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
    19. Tindara Addabbo & Randi Kjeldstad, 2012. "Household affiliation among young adult women and men in Italy and Norway: The significance of work, culture, and money," Department of Economics (DEMB) 0005, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Department of Economics "Marco Biagi".
    20. Frances Goldscheider & Sandra Hofferth & Sally Curtin, 2014. "Parenthood and Leaving Home in Young Adulthood," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer;Southern Demographic Association (SDA), vol. 33(6), pages 771-796, December.
    21. Viola Angelini & Anne Laferrère, 2013. "Parental altruism and nest leaving in Europe: evidence from a retrospective survey," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 11(3), pages 393-420, September.
    22. Addabbo, Tindara & Rodríguez-Modroño, Paula & Gálvez-Muñoz, Lina, 2015. "Young people living as couples: How women's labour supply is adapting to the crisis. Spain as a case study," Economic Systems, Elsevier, vol. 39(1), pages 27-42.
    23. Tindara Addabbo & Paula Rodr íguez-Modroño & Lina Gálvez-Muñoz, 2014. "Youth living in a couple. How women's labour supply adapts to the crisis. The case of Spain," Center for the Analysis of Public Policies (CAPP) 0114, Universita di Modena e Reggio Emilia, Dipartimento di Economia "Marco Biagi".

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Living arrangements; Gender; Social policies; J2; C3; D1;

    JEL classification:

    • J2 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor
    • C3 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables
    • D1 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior

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