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Home-leaving Decision of Daughters and Sons

  • Maria Concetta Chiuri
  • Daniela Del Boca

In spite of relevant differences between countries, a common international pattern emerges: daughters leave parental homes earlier than sons. Drawing upon the European Community Household Panel, we explore the impacts of various factors that affect daughters' and sons' home-leaving decisions. Results show that the decisions of daughters appear to be more responsive to environmental factors than sons'. This implies that policies aiming to speed up the transition to adulthood might have important economic impact on the existing gender differences in family formation and household responsibilities and income inequality across young men and women.

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File URL: http://www.carloalberto.org/assets/working-papers/no.136.pdf
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Paper provided by Collegio Carlo Alberto in its series Carlo Alberto Notebooks with number 136.

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Length: 30 pages
Date of creation: 2009
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:cca:wpaper:136
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  12. David Card & Thomas Lemieux, 1997. "Adapting to Circumstances: The Evolution of Work, School, and Living Arrangements Among North American Youth," Working Papers 765, Princeton University, Department of Economics, Industrial Relations Section..
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  14. Rosenzweig, Mark R & Wolpin, Kenneth I, 1993. "Intergenerational Support and the Life-Cycle Incomes of Young Men and Their Parents: Human Capital Investments, Coresidence, and Intergenerational Financial Transfers," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 11(1), pages 84-112, January.
  15. Chamberlain, Gary, 1980. "Analysis of Covariance with Qualitative Data," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 47(1), pages 225-38, January.
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