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The social stigma of unemployment: consequences of stigma consciousness on job search attitudes, behaviour and success

Author

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  • Gerhard Krug

    (Institute for Employment Research (IAB)
    Friedrich-Alexander University Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU))

  • Katrin Drasch

    (Friedrich-Alexander University Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU))

  • Monika Jungbauer-Gans

    (German Centre of Higher Education Research and Science Studies (DZHW))

Abstract

Studies show that the unemployed face serious disadvantages in the labour market and that the social stigma of unemployment is one explanation. In this paper, we focus on the unemployed’s expectations of being stigmatized (stigma consciousness) and the consequences of such negative expectations on job search attitudes and behaviour. Using data from the panel study “Labour Market and Social Security” (PASS), we find that the unemployed with high stigma consciousness suffer from reduced well-being and health. Regarding job search, the stigmatized unemployed are more likely to expect that their chances of re-employment are low, but in contrast, they are more likely to place a high value on becoming re-employed. Instead of becoming discouraged and passive, we find that stigmatized unemployed individuals increase their job search effort compared to other unemployed individuals. However, despite their higher job search effort, the stigma-conscious unemployed do not have better re-employment chances.

Suggested Citation

  • Gerhard Krug & Katrin Drasch & Monika Jungbauer-Gans, 2019. "The social stigma of unemployment: consequences of stigma consciousness on job search attitudes, behaviour and success," Journal for Labour Market Research, Springer;Institute for Employment Research/ Institut für Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung (IAB), vol. 53(1), pages 1-27, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:jlabrs:v:53:y:2019:i:1:d:10.1186_s12651-019-0261-4
    DOI: 10.1186/s12651-019-0261-4
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

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    2. Wolf, Tobias, 2020. "Welfare while working: How does the life satisfaction approach help to explain job search behavior?," Discussion Papers 2020/14, Free University Berlin, School of Business & Economics.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Unemployment; Social stigma; Stigma consciousness; Job search; Expectancy-value theory;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • J64 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Unemployment: Models, Duration, Incidence, and Job Search
    • J68 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Public Policy
    • J78 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor Discrimination - - - Public Policy (including comparable worth)

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