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Factors Determining Callbacks to Job Applications by the Unemployed: An Audit Study

  • Henry S. Farber

    (Princeton University)

  • Dan Silverman

    (Arizona State University)

  • Till von Wachter

    (University of California Los Angeles)

We use an audit study approach to investigate how unemployment duration, age, and holding a low-level "interim" job affect the likelihood that experienced college- educated females applying for an administrative support job receive a callback from a potential employer. First, the results show no relationship between callback rates and the duration of unemployment. Second, workers age 50 and older are significantly less likely to receive a callback. Third, taking an interim job significantly reduces the likelihood of receiving a callback. Finally, employers who have higher callback rates respond less to observable differences across workers in determining whom to call back. We interpret these results in the context of a model of employer learning about applicant quality.

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Paper provided by Princeton University, Department of Economics, Industrial Relations Section. in its series Working Papers with number 592.

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Date of creation: Oct 2015
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Handle: RePEc:pri:indrel:592
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  1. John M. Nunley & Adam Pugh & Nicholas Romero & Richard Alan Seals, Jr., 2015. "Unemployment, Underemployment, and Employment Opportunities: Results from a Correspondence Audit," Auburn Economics Working Paper Series auwp2015-13, Department of Economics, Auburn University.
  2. Joanna Lahey, 2006. "Age, Women, and Hiring: An Experimental Study," Working Papers, Center for Retirement Research at Boston College wp2006-23, Center for Retirement Research, revised Nov 2006.
  3. Kory Kroft & Fabian Lange & Matthew J. Notowidigdo, 2013. "Duration Dependence and Labor Market Conditions: Evidence from a Field Experiment," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 128(3), pages 1123-1167.
  4. Eriksson, Stefan & Rooth, Dan-Olof, 2011. "Do Employers Use Unemployment as a Sorting Criterion When Hiring? Evidence from a Field Experiment," IZA Discussion Papers 6235, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
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