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Factors Determining Callbacks to Job Applications by the Unemployed: An Audit Study

Author

Listed:
  • Henry S. Farber

    (Princeton University)

  • Dan Silverman

    (Arizona State University)

  • Till von Wachter

    (University of California Los Angeles)

Abstract

We use an audit study approach to investigate how unemployment duration, age, and holding a low-level "interim" job affect the likelihood that experienced college- educated females applying for an administrative support job receive a callback from a potential employer. First, the results show no relationship between callback rates and the duration of unemployment. Second, workers age 50 and older are significantly less likely to receive a callback. Third, taking an interim job significantly reduces the likelihood of receiving a callback. Finally, employers who have higher callback rates respond less to observable differences across workers in determining whom to call back. We interpret these results in the context of a model of employer learning about applicant quality.

Suggested Citation

  • Henry S. Farber & Dan Silverman & Till von Wachter, 2015. "Factors Determining Callbacks to Job Applications by the Unemployed: An Audit Study," Working Papers 592, Princeton University, Department of Economics, Industrial Relations Section..
  • Handle: RePEc:pri:indrel:592
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Kory Kroft & Fabian Lange & Matthew J. Notowidigdo, 2013. "Duration Dependence and Labor Market Conditions: Evidence from a Field Experiment," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 128(3), pages 1123-1167.
    2. Stefan Eriksson & Dan-Olof Rooth, 2014. "Do Employers Use Unemployment as a Sorting Criterion When Hiring? Evidence from a Field Experiment," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 104(3), pages 1014-1039, March.
    3. Joanna N. Lahey, 2008. "Age, Women, and Hiring: An Experimental Study," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 43(1).
    4. John M. Nunley & Adam Pugh & Nicholas Romero & Richard Alan Seals, Jr., 2015. "Unemployment, Underemployment, and Employment Opportunities: Results from a Correspondence Audit," Auburn Economics Working Paper Series auwp2015-13, Department of Economics, Auburn University.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Abraham, Katharine G. & Haltiwanger, John C. & Sandusky, L. Kristin & Spletzer, James R., 2016. "The Consequences of Long Term Unemployment: Evidence from Matched Employer-Employee Data," IZA Discussion Papers 10223, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    2. Henry S. Farber & Dan Silverman & Till von Wachter, 2016. "Determinants of Callbacks to Job Applications: An Audit Study," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 106(5), pages 314-318, May.
    3. Johannes F. Schmieder & Till von Wachter & Stefan Bender, 2016. "The Effect of Unemployment Benefits and Nonemployment Durations on Wages," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 106(3), pages 739-777, March.
    4. Ahn, Hie Joo, 2016. "Heterogeneity in the Dynamics of Disaggregate Unemployment," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2016-063, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    5. David Neumark & Ian Burn & Patrick Button & Nanneh Chehras, 2016. "Do State Laws Protecting Older Workers from Discrimination Reduce Age Discrimination in Hiring? Experimental (and Nonexperimental) Evidence," Working Papers wp349, University of Michigan, Michigan Retirement Research Center.
    6. Katharine G. Abraham & Melissa S. Kearney, 2018. "Explaining the Decline in the U.S. Employment-to-Population Ratio: A Review of the Evidence," NBER Working Papers 24333, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Kevin Fawcett & Shouyong Shi, 2018. "Learning, On-the-Job Search and Wage-Tenure Contracts," Working Papers tecipa-597, University of Toronto, Department of Economics.
    8. Boyd-Swan, Casey & Herbst, Chris M., 2017. "The Demand for Teacher Characteristics in the Market for Child Care: Evidence from a Field Experiment," IZA Discussion Papers 10702, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    9. Boyd-Swan, Casey & Herbst, Chris M., 2017. "Racial and Ethnic Discrimination in the Labor Market for Child Care Teachers," IZA Discussion Papers 11140, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    10. Katharine G. Abraham & John C. Haltiwanger & Kristin Sandusky & James Spletzer, 2016. "The Consequences of Long-Term Unemployment: Evidence from Linked Survey and Administrative Data," NBER Working Papers 22665, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • J60 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - General
    • J62 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Job, Occupational and Intergenerational Mobility; Promotion

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