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Diversified specialisation—going one step beyond regional economics’ specialisation-diversification concept

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  • Oliver Farhauer

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  • Alexandra Kröll

Abstract

In der ökonomischen Theorie wird in Bezug auf die Charakterisierung von Branchenstrukturen für gewöhnlich zwischen Spezialisierung und Diversifizierung unterschieden. Aus einer spezialisierten Sektorenstruktur entstehen Lokalisationsvorteile und MAR (Marshall-Arrow-Romer)-Externalitäten, während in einem diversifizierten Umfeld Urbanisierungsvorteile und Jacobs-Externalitäten dominieren. In vorliegender Arbeit wird die Dichotomie Spezialisierung/Diversifizierung um das Konzept der diversifizierten Spezialisierung erweitert. Städte, die mehrere Branchenschwerpunkte aufweisen, also auf einige wenige Branchen spezialisiert sind, profitieren sowohl von MAR- als auch von Jacobs-Externalitäten. Im Gegensatz zu diversifizierten Städten sind diversifiziert spezialisierte Städte meist kleiner, wodurch Überfüllungs- und Produktionskosten dort geringer sind. Ihr Vorteil gegenüber spezialisierten Städten besteht in einer stärker diversifizierten Branchenstruktur, welche branchenübergreifende Spillover und eine bessere Abfederung von branchenspezifischen Nachfrageschocks ermöglicht. In vorliegender Arbeit wird ein Maß für den Grad der diversifizierten Spezialisierung vorgeschlagen und der Einfluss der Branchenstruktur auf das Wirtschaftswachstum wird mittels Regressionsanalysen empirisch untersucht. Hierzu wird ein Paneldatensatz, der Informationen zu allen 118 kreisfreien Städten Deutschlands für die Jahre von 1998 bis 2008 (je nach Spezifikation des jeweiligen Modells) enthält, verwendet. Dabei bestätigt sich die Vorteilhaftigkeit einer diversifiziert spezialisierten Branchenstruktur für das regionale Wirtschaftswachstum. Copyright Springer-Verlag 2012

Suggested Citation

  • Oliver Farhauer & Alexandra Kröll, 2012. "Diversified specialisation—going one step beyond regional economics’ specialisation-diversification concept," Review of Regional Research: Jahrbuch für Regionalwissenschaft, Springer;Gesellschaft für Regionalforschung (GfR), vol. 32(1), pages 63-84, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:jahrfr:v:32:y:2012:i:1:p:63-84
    DOI: 10.1007/s10037-011-0063-9
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Fulvio Castellacci & Davide Consoli & Artur Santoalha, 2018. "Technological Diversification in European Regions: The Role of E-skills," Working Papers on Innovation Studies 20181009, Centre for Technology, Innovation and Culture, University of Oslo.
    2. Saheum Hong & Yu Xiao, 2016. "The Influence of Multiple Specializations on Economic Performance in U.S. Metropolitan Areas," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 8(9), pages 1-16, September.
    3. Elitsa R. Banalieva & Kimberly A. Eddleston & Thomas M. Zellweger, 2015. "When do family firms have an advantage in transitioning economies? Toward a dynamic institution-based view," Strategic Management Journal, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 36(9), pages 1358-1377, September.
    4. Uwe Blien & Lutz Eigenhueller & Markus Promberger & Norbert Schanne, 2013. "The Shift-Share Regression: An Application to Regional Employ-ment Development," ERSA conference papers ersa13p614, European Regional Science Association.
    5. Ron Martin & Peter Sunley & Ben Gardiner & Peter Tyler, 2016. "How Regions React to Recessions: Resilience and the Role of Economic Structure," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 50(4), pages 561-585, April.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Regional economic growth; Agglomeration externalities; Specialisation; Diversification; O47; O52; R11; R30;

    JEL classification:

    • O47 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - Empirical Studies of Economic Growth; Aggregate Productivity; Cross-Country Output Convergence
    • O52 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Europe
    • R11 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Regional Economic Activity: Growth, Development, Environmental Issues, and Changes
    • R30 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Real Estate Markets, Spatial Production Analysis, and Firm Location - - - General

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