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How well does a dynamic Mincer equation fit NLSY data? Evidence based on a simple wage-bargaining model

  • Corrado Andini


This article argues that a dynamic Mincer equation can be seen as the solution of a simple wage-bargaining model between a worker and an employer where the unemployment-benefit level, affecting the outside option of the worker, depends on past wages. Further, it shows that this model provides a good fit of the US National Longitudinal Survey of Youth data. The evidence is robust to a number of sensitivity checks. Copyright Springer-Verlag 2013

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Article provided by Springer in its journal Empirical Economics.

Volume (Year): 44 (2013)
Issue (Month): 3 (June)
Pages: 1519-1543

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Handle: RePEc:spr:empeco:v:44:y:2013:i:3:p:1519-1543
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  1. Philip A. Trostel, 2005. "Nonlinearity in the return to education," Journal of Applied Economics, Universidad del CEMA, vol. 0, pages 191-202, May.
  2. Steve Bond, 2002. "Dynamic panel data models: a guide to microdata methods and practice," CeMMAP working papers CWP09/02, Centre for Microdata Methods and Practice, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
  3. Corrado Andini, 2007. "Returns to education and wage equations: a dynamic approach," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 14(8), pages 577-579.
  4. Ariel Rubinstein, 2010. "Perfect Equilibrium in a Bargaining Model," Levine's Working Paper Archive 661465000000000387, David K. Levine.
  5. Chéron, Arnaud & Langot, François, 2010. "On-the-job search equilibrium with endogenous unemployment benefits," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 17(2), pages 383-391, April.
  6. Blundell, Richard & Bond, Stephen, 1998. "Initial conditions and moment restrictions in dynamic panel data models," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 87(1), pages 115-143, August.
  7. Burkhard Heer, 2006. "Should Unemployment Benefits Be Related to Previous Earnings?," FinanzArchiv: Public Finance Analysis, Mohr Siebeck, Tübingen, vol. 62(4), pages 530-550, December.
  8. David Roodman, 2009. "A Note on the Theme of Too Many Instruments," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 71(1), pages 135-158, 02.
  9. Jeffrey M. Wooldridge, 2005. "Simple solutions to the initial conditions problem in dynamic, nonlinear panel data models with unobserved heterogeneity," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 20(1), pages 39-54.
  10. Lars Ljungqvist & Thomas J. Sargent, 1996. "The European Unemployment Dilemma," EUI-RSCAS Working Papers 36, European University Institute (EUI), Robert Schuman Centre of Advanced Studies (RSCAS).
  11. Richard Blundell & Steve Bond, 1999. "GMM estimation with persistent panel data: an application to production functions," IFS Working Papers W99/04, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
  12. Arellano, Manuel & Bover, Olympia, 1995. "Another look at the instrumental variable estimation of error-components models," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 68(1), pages 29-51, July.
  13. Andini, Corrado, 2007. "A Dynamic Mincer Equation with an Application to Portuguese Data," IZA Discussion Papers 2897, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  14. Flannery, Mark J. & Rangan, Kasturi P., 2006. "Partial adjustment toward target capital structures," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 79(3), pages 469-506, March.
  15. Manuel Arellano & Stephen Bond, 1991. "Some Tests of Specification for Panel Data: Monte Carlo Evidence and an Application to Employment Equations," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 58(2), pages 277-297.
  16. Dalmazzo, Alberto, 1992. "Outside options in a bargaining model with decay in the size of the cake," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 40(4), pages 417-421, December.
  17. Fatih Guvenen, 2007. "An empirical investigation of labor income processes," IFS Working Papers W07/13, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
  18. Francis Vella & Marno Verbeek, 1998. "Whose wages do unions raise? A dynamic model of unionism and wage rate determination for young men," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 13(2), pages 163-183.
  19. Andini, Corrado, 2009. "How Fast Do Wages Adjust to Human-Capital Productivity? Dynamic Panel-Data Evidence from Belgium, Denmark and Finland," IZA Discussion Papers 4583, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  20. Pereira, Pedro T. & Martins, Pedro S., 2001. "Returns to Education and Wage Equations," IZA Discussion Papers 298, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  21. Murphy, Kevin M & Welch, Finis, 1990. "Empirical Age-Earnings Profiles," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 8(2), pages 202-29, April.
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