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Enhancing the relevance of Shared Socioeconomic Pathways for climate change impacts, adaptation and vulnerability research

Author

Listed:
  • Bas Ruijven

    ()

  • Marc Levy
  • Arun Agrawal
  • Frank Biermann
  • Joern Birkmann
  • Timothy Carter
  • Kristie Ebi
  • Matthias Garschagen
  • Bryan Jones
  • Roger Jones
  • Eric Kemp-Benedict
  • Marcel Kok
  • Kasper Kok
  • Maria Lemos
  • Paul Lucas
  • Ben Orlove
  • Shonali Pachauri
  • Tom Parris
  • Anand Patwardhan
  • Arthur Petersen
  • Benjamin Preston
  • Jesse Ribot
  • Dale Rothman
  • Vanessa Schweizer

Abstract

This paper discusses the role and relevance of the shared socioeconomic pathways (SSPs) and the new scenarios that combine SSPs with representative concentration pathways (RCPs) for climate change impacts, adaptation, and vulnerability (IAV) research. It first provides an overview of uses of social–environmental scenarios in IAV studies and identifies the main shortcomings of earlier such scenarios. Second, the paper elaborates on two aspects of the SSPs and new scenarios that would improve their usefulness for IAV studies compared to earlier scenario sets: (i) enhancing their applicability while retaining coherence across spatial scales, and (ii) adding indicators of importance for projecting vulnerability. The paper therefore presents an agenda for future research, recommending that SSPs incorporate not only the standard variables of population and gross domestic product, but also indicators such as income distribution, spatial population, human health and governance. Copyright The Author(s) 2014

Suggested Citation

  • Bas Ruijven & Marc Levy & Arun Agrawal & Frank Biermann & Joern Birkmann & Timothy Carter & Kristie Ebi & Matthias Garschagen & Bryan Jones & Roger Jones & Eric Kemp-Benedict & Marcel Kok & Kasper Kok, 2014. "Enhancing the relevance of Shared Socioeconomic Pathways for climate change impacts, adaptation and vulnerability research," Climatic Change, Springer, vol. 122(3), pages 481-494, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:climat:v:122:y:2014:i:3:p:481-494
    DOI: 10.1007/s10584-013-0931-0
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Kemp-Benedict, Eric & Carlsen, Henrik & Kartha, Sivan, 2019. "Large-scale scenarios as ‘boundary conditions’: A cross-impact balance simulated annealing (CIBSA) approach," Technological Forecasting and Social Change, Elsevier, vol. 143(C), pages 55-63.
    2. Palazzo, Amanda & Vervoort, Joost M. & Mason- D'Croz, Daniel & Rutting, Lucas & Havlik, Petr & Islam, Shahnila & Bayala, Jules & Kadi, Hame Kadi & Thornton, Philip & Zougmore, Robert, "undated". "Interpreting the Shared Socio-economic Pathways under Climate Change for the ECOWAS region through a stakeholder and multi-model process," 2016 Fifth International Conference, September 23-26, 2016, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia 246970, African Association of Agricultural Economists (AAAE).
    3. Giovanni Matteo & Pierfrancesco Nardi & Stefano Grego & Caterina Guidi, 2018. "Bibliometric analysis of Climate Change Vulnerability Assessment research," Environment Systems and Decisions, Springer, vol. 38(4), pages 508-516, December.
    4. Stefan Greiving & Leonie Schödl & Karl-Heinz Gaudry & Iris Katherine Quintana Miralles & Benjamín Prado Larraín & Mark Fleischhauer & Myriam Margoth Jácome Guerra & Jonathan Tobar, 2021. "Multi-Risk Assessment and Management—A Comparative Study of the Current State of Affairs in Chile and Ecuador," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 13(3), pages 1-23, January.
    5. McManamay, Ryan A. & DeRolph, Christopher R. & Surendran-Nair, Sujithkumar & Allen-Dumas, Melissa, 2019. "Spatially explicit land-energy-water future scenarios for cities: Guiding infrastructure transitions for urban sustainability," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 112(C), pages 880-900.
    6. Ren, Chongqiang & Zhai, Guofang & Zhou, Shutian & Li, Shasha & Chen, Wei, 2017. "Adaptation assessment and analysis of economic growth since the market reform in China," Economics Discussion Papers 2017-24, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
    7. van Ruijven, Bas J. & O’Neill, Brian C. & Chateau, Jean, 2015. "Methods for including income distribution in global CGE models for long-term climate change research," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 51(C), pages 530-543.
    8. Gillian Foster, 2019. "Low-Carbon Futures for Bioethylene in the United States," Energies, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 12(10), pages 1-20, May.
    9. Daigneault, Adam & Johnston, Craig & Korosuo, Anu & Baker, Justin S. & Forsell, Nicklas & Prestemon, Jeffrey P. & Abt, Robert C., 2019. "Developing Detailed Shared Socioeconomic Pathway (SSP) Narratives for the Global Forest Sector," Journal of Forest Economics, now publishers, vol. 34(1-2), pages 7-45, August.
    10. Jesús Crespo Cuaresma & Wolfgang Fengler & Homi Kharas & Karim Bekhtiar & Michael Brottrager & Martin Hofer, 2018. "Will the Sustainable Development Goals be fulfilled? Assessing present and future global poverty," Palgrave Communications, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 4(1), pages 1-8, December.

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