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The Evolution of Awareness and Belief Ambiguity in the Process of High School Track Choice

Author

Listed:
  • Pamela Giustinelli

    (University of Michigan)

  • Nicola Pavoni

    (Bocconi University)

Abstract

In this article, we provide novel survey evidence on middle schoolers' knowledge and on how such knowledge evolves in the process of high school track choice. Children in our study display only partial awareness of the set of available tracks, and they report low confidence regarding their beliefs (i.e., substantial belief ambiguity) about their likelihood of a regular high school path. This is especially the case for lower-ranked tracks. Students start 8th grade with greater information about their preferred alternatives and continue to concentrate their search in the months before pre-enrollment. Children from less advantaged families display lower initial perceived knowledge and acquire information at a slower pace, particularly about college-preparatory schools. (Copyright: Elsevier)

Suggested Citation

  • Pamela Giustinelli & Nicola Pavoni, 2017. "The Evolution of Awareness and Belief Ambiguity in the Process of High School Track Choice," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 25, pages 93-120, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:red:issued:16-101
    DOI: 10.1016/j.red.2017.01.002
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Pamela Giustinelli & Charles F. Manski & Francesca Molinari, 2018. "Tail and Center Rounding of Probabilistic Expectations in the Health and Retirement Study," NBER Working Papers 24559, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Subjective Beliefs; Learning under Ambiguity and Limited Awareness; School Choice;

    JEL classification:

    • D83 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Search; Learning; Information and Knowledge; Communication; Belief; Unawareness
    • I24 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Education and Inequality
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity

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