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Economic and security consequences of supreme values

  • Arye Hillman

    ()

Islamic societies have in contemporary times lagged Western societies in income, growth, and human-development indicators. The supreme values of radical Islam further de-prioritize economic achievement and impose self-deprivation on own populations. This paper investigates the reasons for economic outcomes under Islam. Contemporary illustrations are also provided of the self-deprivation predicted from pursuit of the supreme-value objectives of radical Islam. The self-deprivation is placed in a rent-seeking context. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2007

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File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s11127-007-9167-8
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Article provided by Springer in its journal Public Choice.

Volume (Year): 131 (2007)
Issue (Month): 3 (June)
Pages: 259-280

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Handle: RePEc:kap:pubcho:v:131:y:2007:i:3:p:259-280
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