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The Reluctant Economist

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  • Easterlin,Richard A.

Abstract

Where is rapid economic growth taking us? Why has its spread throughout the world been so limited? What are the causes of the great twentieth century advance in life expectancy? Of the revolution in childbearing that is bringing fertility worldwide to near replacement levels? Have free markets been the source of human improvement? Economics provides a start on these questions, but only a start, argues economist Richard A. Easterlin. To answer them calls for merging economics with concepts and data from other social sciences, and with quantitative and qualitative history. Easterlin demonstrates this approach in seeking answers to these and other questions about world or American experience in the last two centuries, drawing on economics, demography, sociology, history, and psychology. The opening chapter gives an autobiographical account of the evolution of this approach, and why Easterlin is a 'reluctant economist'.

Suggested Citation

  • Easterlin,Richard A., 2004. "The Reluctant Economist," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521829748.
  • Handle: RePEc:cup:cbooks:9780521829748
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    Cited by:

    1. McCloskey, Deirdre N., 2013. "Tunzelmann, Schumpeter, and the Hockey Stick," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 42(10), pages 1706-1715.
    2. McCloskey, Deirdre Nansen, 2009. "Growth, Quality, Happiness, and the Poor," MPRA Paper 17967, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Charles Kenny, 2009. "There's more to life than money: Exploring the levels|growth paradox in income and health," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 21(1), pages 24-41.
    4. Easterlin, Richard A. & Angelescu McVey, Laura, 2007. "Modern Economic Growth and Quality of Life: Cross Sectional and Time Series Evidence," IZA Discussion Papers 2755, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    5. McCloskey, Deirdre Nansen, 2009. "Bourgeois dignity and liberty: Why economics can’t explain the modern world," MPRA Paper 16805, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. McCloskey, Deirdre Nansen, 2009. "Science, Bourgeois Dignity, and the Industrial Revolution," MPRA Paper 22308, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. McCloskey, Deirdre Nansen, 2009. "Saving, Investment, Greed, and Original Accumulation Do Not Explain Growth," MPRA Paper 18587, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. Anke Plagnol & Richard Easterlin, 2008. "Aspirations, Attainments, and Satisfaction: Life Cycle Differences Between American Women and Men," Journal of Happiness Studies, Springer, vol. 9(4), pages 601-619, December.
    9. McCloskey, Deirdre Nansen, 2009. "The Inheritance of Gregory Clark," MPRA Paper 21326, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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