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Immigration as a challenge to the Danish welfare state?

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  • Nannestad, Peter

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  • Nannestad, Peter, 2004. "Immigration as a challenge to the Danish welfare state?," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 20(3), pages 755-767, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:poleco:v:20:y:2004:i:3:p:755-767
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Nielsen, Helena Skyt & Rosholm, Michael & Smith, Nina & Husted, Leif, 2001. "Intergenerational Transmissions and the School-to-Work Transition of 2nd Generation Immigrants," IZA Discussion Papers 296, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    2. Hansen, Jorgen Drud, 2003. "Immigration and income redistribution in welfare states," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 19(4), pages 735-746, November.
    3. Borjas, George J, 1999. "Immigration and Welfare Magnets," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 17(4), pages 607-637, October.
    4. Barry R. Chiswick, 1999. "Are Immigrants Favorably Self-Selected? An Economic Analysis," University of Chicago - George G. Stigler Center for Study of Economy and State 147, Chicago - Center for Study of Economy and State.
    5. Wellisch, Dietmar & Walz, Uwe, 1998. "Why do rich countries prefer free trade over free migration? The role of the modern welfare state," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 42(8), pages 1595-1612, September.
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