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Misplaced Applications of Economic Theory to the Middle East


  • Steven Plaut



Tyler Cowen in this issue proposes an application of public choice and game theory as a means of understanding the Middle East conflict and viewing the ``Road Map for Middle East Peace''. Cowen's approach is not based on appreciation of the ``hidden agendas and rules of the game'' that are present in the Middle East. Economic theory may indeed usefully contribute to understanding aspects of the Middle East war, but through different avenues and in different directions from those suggested by Cowen. In this paper I suggest a view consistent with the institutional characteristics of the conflict and the objectives of the participants.

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  • Steven Plaut, 2004. "Misplaced Applications of Economic Theory to the Middle East," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 118(1_2), pages 11-24, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:pubcho:v:118:y:2004:i:1_2:p:11-24

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Birdsall, Nancy & Claessens, Stijn & Diwan, Ishac, 2002. "Will HIPC Matter? The Debt Game and Donor Behaviour in Africa," CEPR Discussion Papers 3297, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    2. Douglas Menzies, G., 2000. "Debt Forgiveness: the Case for Hyper-Incentive Contracts," Economics Series Working Papers 9937, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
    3. Howard White & Oliver Morrissey, 1997. "Conditionality When Donor And Recipient Preferences Vary," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 9(4), pages 497-505.
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    Cited by:

    1. Jan Schnellenbach, 2006. "Appeasing nihilists? Some economic thoughts on reducing terrorist activity," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 129(3), pages 301-313, December.
    2. Charles Rowley & Jennis Taylor, 2006. "The Israel and Palestine land settlement problem, 1948–2005: An analytical history," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 128(1), pages 77-90, July.
    3. Arye Hillman, 2007. "Economic and security consequences of supreme values," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 131(3), pages 259-280, June.
    4. Hillman, Arye L., 2010. "Expressive behavior in economics and politics," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 26(4), pages 403-418, December.
    5. Arye Hillman, 2011. "Expressive voting and identity: evidence from a case study of a group of U.S. voters," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 148(1), pages 249-257, July.
    6. repec:eee:touman:v:31:y:2010:i:2:p:240-249 is not listed on IDEAS

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