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The Interaction between Housing Investment and Economic Growth in China

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Abstract

The importance of housing investment in the national economy and its rapid growth have become distinct characteristics of the Chinese economy in recent years. However, at the same time, there is a concern that the economic growth heavily dependent on housing investment may compromise the stability and the health of the national economy. Using Granger causality analysis, this paper examines the interaction between housing investment and economic growth as well as that between non-housing investment and economic growth. We find evidence that housing investment has a stronger short run effect on economic growth than non-housing investment. We also find that housing investment has a long run effect on economic growth while economic growth has a log run effect on both housing and non-housing investment. Our findings suggest that housing investment is an important factor for the short-term fluctuations of economic growth, with its growth stimulating the economic growth and its slumps leading to downside fluctuations.

Suggested Citation

  • Liu Hongyu & Yun W. Park & Zheng Siqi, 2002. "The Interaction between Housing Investment and Economic Growth in China," International Real Estate Review, Asian Real Estate Society, vol. 5(1), pages 40-60.
  • Handle: RePEc:ire:issued:v:05:n:01:2002:p:40_60
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Wensheng Peng & Dickson C. Tam & Matthew S. Yiu, 2007. "The Property Market and the Macroeconomy of the Mainland: A Cross Region Study," Working Papers 052007, Hong Kong Institute for Monetary Research.
    2. Michael, Bryane & Zhao, Simon, 2016. "Bubble Economics How Big a Shock to China’s Real Estate Sector Will Throw the Country into Recession, and Why Does It Matter?," EconStor Preprints 141314, ZBW - German National Library of Economics.
    3. Zhang, Yanbing & Hua, Xiuping & Zhao, Liang, 2011. "Monetary policy and housing prices : a case study of Chinese experience in 1999-2010," BOFIT Discussion Papers 17/2011, Bank of Finland, Institute for Economies in Transition.
    4. Dreger, Christian & Zhang, Yanqun, 2010. "Is there a bubble in the Chinese housing market?," Discussion Papers 290, European University Viadrina Frankfurt (Oder), Department of Business Administration and Economics.
    5. Xiaolong Liu & Weidong Qu, 2015. "Winner's Curse or Signaling? Bidding Outcomes in the Chinese Land Market," International Real Estate Review, Asian Real Estate Society, vol. 18(1), pages 113-129.
    6. Liu, Chunping & Ou, Zhirong, 2017. "What determines China's housing price dynamics? New evidence from a DSGE-VAR," Cardiff Economics Working Papers E2017/4, Cardiff University, Cardiff Business School, Economics Section.
    7. Erol, Isil & Unal, Umut, 2015. "Role of Construction Sector in Economic Growth: New Evidence from Turkey," MPRA Paper 68263, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. Honghao Ren & Henk Folmer & Arno Vlist, 2014. "What role does the real estate–construction sector play in China’s regional economy?," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 52(3), pages 839-857, May.
    9. Steven A Barnett & Ray Brooks, 2006. "What’s Driving Investment in China?," IMF Working Papers 06/265, International Monetary Fund.
    10. Kazuya Tani & Yoshiyuki Kikuchi & Hideo Takaoka & Shubin Lin, 2014. "Housing Acquisition Process for Public Housing and Commodity Housing in Shanghai: A Survey of Residents," International Real Estate Review, Asian Real Estate Society, vol. 17(3), pages 415-444.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Economic growth; housing investment; non-housing investment; Granger causality; cointegration; error correction model;

    JEL classification:

    • L85 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Services - - - Real Estate Services

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