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Government science and technology budgets in times of crisis

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  • Makkonen, Teemu

Abstract

Following a recent paper by Filippetti and Archibugi [Filippetti, A., Archibugi, D., 2011. Innovation in times of crisis: National systems of innovation, structure and demand. Research Policy 40(2), 179–192], this article aims to contribute to the sparse literature on the impacts of the recent economic downturn on the government expenditures and innovative activities of the countries of the enlarged European Union (EU-27). Using Eurostat's socio-economic objectives i.e. the Nomenclature for the Analysis and Comparison of Scientific Programmes and Budgets (NABS 2007 classification), this paper addresses the impact of the recent economic downturn on governments’ science and technology (S&T) budgets across the 27 EU countries. Most countries followed a pro-cyclical pattern, where the government S&T budgets in most NABS shrunk along slowing gross domestic product growth in similar pace with total government expenditure. The new member states of Eastern Europe were the most affected.

Suggested Citation

  • Makkonen, Teemu, 2013. "Government science and technology budgets in times of crisis," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 42(3), pages 817-822.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:respol:v:42:y:2013:i:3:p:817-822
    DOI: 10.1016/j.respol.2012.10.002
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Cruz-Castro, Laura & Sanz-Menéndez, Luis, 2016. "The effects of the economic crisis on public research: Spanish budgetary policies and research organizations," Technological Forecasting and Social Change, Elsevier, vol. 113(PB), pages 157-167.
    2. repec:ura:ecregj:v:1:y:2017:i:4:p:1314-1328 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Pellens, Maikel & Peters, Bettina & Hud, Martin & Rammer, Christian & Licht, Georg, 2018. "Public investment in R&D in reaction to economic crises: A longitudinal study for OECD countries," ZEW Discussion Papers 18-005, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
    4. Hud, Martin & Hussinger, Katrin, 2015. "The impact of R&D subsidies during the crisis," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 44(10), pages 1844-1855.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Economic crisis; European Union; Public R&D funding; S&T budgets;

    JEL classification:

    • H59 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - Other
    • H69 - Public Economics - - National Budget, Deficit, and Debt - - - Other
    • O38 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Government Policy

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