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Government Spending Cycles: Ideological or Opportunistic?

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  • van Dalen, Hendrik P
  • Swank, Otto H

Abstract

This paper examines whether partisan and opportunistic motives affect government expenditure growth in the Netherlands. The time series analysis, covering the period 1953-93, allows for different types of government spending. In general, spending is inspired by ideological and opportunistic motives: all government expenditure categories show an upward drift during election times and the 'partisan' motives behind government spending are clearly revealed: cabinets attach greater importance to social security and healthcare than right-wing cabinets and right-wing cabinets value expenditure on infrastructure and defense more than left-wing parties. Copyright 1996 by Kluwer Academic Publishers

Suggested Citation

  • van Dalen, Hendrik P & Swank, Otto H, 1996. "Government Spending Cycles: Ideological or Opportunistic?," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 89(1-2), pages 183-200, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:pubcho:v:89:y:1996:i:1-2:p:183-200
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