IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/oup/scippl/v29y2002i6p409-417.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

The elusive partnership: Science and foreign policy

Author

Listed:
  • Caroline S Wagner

Abstract

Nearly ten years after Eugene Skolnikoff tagged science, technology, and international affairs the “elusive transformation,” the relationship has evolved, but both policy communities remain dissatisfied with the linkages. This may be unavoidable. Science and foreign policy have very different dynamics: one is a networked, peer-based community that holds few traditions; the other is a hierarchy of relationships based on history, protocol, and tradition. Nevertheless, these two systems find that their interests are increasingly overlapping, as the foreign policy portfolio contains issues with a scientific component, and as science grows more international in scope and practice. This article seeks to explicate the foreign policy aspects of science: its policy motivations, structures, and processes, in an effort to explain at least one part of the partnership. Science represents a potentially powerful tool for improving international relations, and learning to use it may benefit both science and international affairs. Copyright , Beech Tree Publishing.

Suggested Citation

  • Caroline S Wagner, 2002. "The elusive partnership: Science and foreign policy," Science and Public Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 29(6), pages 409-417, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:scippl:v:29:y:2002:i:6:p:409-417
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.3152/147154302781780741
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Makkonen, Teemu, 2013. "Government science and technology budgets in times of crisis," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 42(3), pages 817-822.
    2. Koen Jonkers & Laura Cruz Castro, 2010. "The internationalisation of public sector research through international joint laboratories," Working Papers 1014, Instituto de Políticas y Bienes Públicos (IPP), CSIC.
    3. Andrej Kastrin & Jelena Klisara & Borut Lužar & Janez Povh, 2017. "Analysis of Slovenian research community through bibliographic networks," Scientometrics, Springer;Akadémiai Kiadó, vol. 110(2), pages 791-813, February.
    4. Stefan Hennemann & Diego Rybski & Ingo Liefner, 2011. "The Myth of Global Science," ERSA conference papers ersa10p246, European Regional Science Association.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:oup:scippl:v:29:y:2002:i:6:p:409-417. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Oxford University Press) or (Christopher F. Baum). General contact details of provider: .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.