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The effect of interest in renewable energy on US household electricity consumption: An analysis using Google Trends data

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  • Park, Sungjun
  • Kim, Jinsoo

Abstract

Google Trends is a service based on big data that shows the frequency of global searches in real time. As an index of individual interest, Google Trends has been used in various research fields. This study estimates the relationship between household electricity consumption and individuals' interest in energy based on Google Trends data. In particular, from the viewpoint of renewable energy, we compare the relationship between electricity consumption and the “renewable” Google Trends keyword with that between electricity consumption and other keywords. A model is constructed to examine the effect on household consumption of substituting electricity with renewable energy. We find that household electricity consumption decreases by 16.017 million kWh for every one unit increase in search of the “renewable” keyword. This study therefore illustrates that Google Trends enables the estimation of driving factors that are difficult to uncover when analyzing with various economic indicators.

Suggested Citation

  • Park, Sungjun & Kim, Jinsoo, 2018. "The effect of interest in renewable energy on US household electricity consumption: An analysis using Google Trends data," Renewable Energy, Elsevier, vol. 127(C), pages 1004-1010.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:renene:v:127:y:2018:i:c:p:1004-1010
    DOI: 10.1016/j.renene.2018.05.044
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Gabriel Valerio-Ureña & Richard Rogers, 2019. "Characteristics of the Digital Content about Energy-Saving in Different Countries around the World," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 11(17), pages 1-14, August.
    2. Hirase, Y. & Noro, O. & Nakagawa, H. & Yoshimura, E. & Katsura, S. & Abe, K. & Sugimoto, K. & Sakimoto, K., 2018. "Decentralised and interlink-less power interchange among residences in microgrids using virtual synchronous generator control," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 228(C), pages 2437-2447.
    3. Aliyu Salisu Barau & Aliyu Haidar Abubakar & Abdul-Hakim Ibrahim Kiyawa, 2020. "Not There Yet: Mapping Inhibitions to Solar Energy Utilisation by Households in African Informal Urban Neighbourhoods," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 12(3), pages 1-14, January.
    4. Minyoung Yang & Jinsoo Kim, 2020. "Revisiting the Relation between Renewable Electricity and Economic Growth: A Renewable–Growth Hypothesis," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 12(8), pages 1-22, April.
    5. Salisu, Afees A. & Ogbonna, Ahamuefula E. & Adewuyi, Adeolu, 2020. "Google trends and the predictability of precious metals," Resources Policy, Elsevier, vol. 65(C).

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