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Residential electricity demand in Spain: New empirical evidence using aggregate data

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  • Blázquez, Leticia
  • Boogen, Nina
  • Filippini, Massimo

Abstract

This paper presents an empirical analysis on residential demand for electricity. This analysis has been performed using aggregate panel data at the province level for 47 Spanish provinces for the period from 2000 to 2008. For this purpose, we estimated a log–log demand equation for electricity consumption using a dynamic partial adjustment approach. This dynamic demand function has been estimated using a two-step system GMM estimator proposed by Blundell and Bond (1998). The purpose of this empirical analysis is to highlight some of the characteristics of Spanish residential electricity demand. Particular attention has been paid to the influence of price, income, and weather conditions on electricity demand. The estimated short and long-run own price elasticities are negative, as expected, but lower than 1. Furthermore, weather variables have a significant impact on electricity demand.

Suggested Citation

  • Blázquez, Leticia & Boogen, Nina & Filippini, Massimo, 2013. "Residential electricity demand in Spain: New empirical evidence using aggregate data," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 36(C), pages 648-657.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:eneeco:v:36:y:2013:i:c:p:648-657
    DOI: 10.1016/j.eneco.2012.11.010
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Residential electricity demand; Panel data; Partial adjustment model; Aggregate data;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • D - Microeconomics
    • D2 - Microeconomics - - Production and Organizations
    • Q - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics
    • Q4 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy
    • R2 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Household Analysis

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