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Electricity prices and fuel costs: Long-run relations and short-run dynamics

  • Mohammadi, Hassan
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    The paper examines the long-run relation and short-run dynamics between electricity prices and three fossil fuel prices - coal, natural gas and crude oil - using annual data for the U.S. for 1960-2007. The results suggest (1) a stable long-run relation between real prices for electricity and coal (2) Bi-directional long-run causality between coal and electricity prices. (3) Insignificant long-run relations between electricity and crude oil and/or natural gas prices. And (4) no evidence of asymmetries in the adjustment of electricity prices to deviations from equilibrium. A number of implications are addressed.

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    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Energy Economics.

    Volume (Year): 31 (2009)
    Issue (Month): 3 (May)
    Pages: 503-509

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:eneeco:v:31:y:2009:i:3:p:503-509
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    5. Oscar Bajo-Rubio & Carmen Díaz-Roldán & Vicente Esteve, 2003. "Searching for Threshold Effects in the Evolution of Budget Deficits: An Application to the Spanish Case," Economic Working Papers at Centro de Estudios Andaluces E2003/29, Centro de Estudios Andaluces.
    6. Dibooglu, Selahattin & Enders, Walter, 2001. "Do Real Wages Respond Asymmetrically to Unemployment Shocks? Evidence from the U.S. and Canada," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 23(4), pages 495-515, October.
    7. Enders, Walter & Granger, Clive W J, 1998. "Unit-Root Tests and Asymmetric Adjustment with an Example Using the Term Structure of Interest Rates," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 16(3), pages 304-11, July.
    8. James Payne & Hassan Mohammadi, 2006. "Are Adjustments in the U.S. Budget Deficit Asymmetric? Another Look at Sustainability," Atlantic Economic Journal, International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 34(1), pages 15-22, March.
    9. Pippenger, Michael K & Goering, Gregory E, 1993. "A Note on the Empirical Power of Unit Root Tests under Threshold Processes," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 55(4), pages 473-81, November.
    10. Johansen, Soren, 1988. "Statistical analysis of cointegration vectors," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 12(2-3), pages 231-254.
    11. Bradley T. Ewing & Shawkat M. Hammoudeh & Mark A. Thompson, 2006. "Examining Asymmetric Behavior in US Petroleum Futures and Spot Prices," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 3), pages 9-24.
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