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The private and social consequences of purchasing an electric vehicle and solar panels: Evidence from California

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  • Delmas, Magali A.
  • Kahn, Matthew E.
  • Locke, Stephen L.

Abstract

Rising greenhouse gas emissions raise the risk of severe climate change. The household sector׳s greenhouse gas emissions have increased over time as more people drive gasoline cars and consume electricity generated using coal and natural gas. The household sector׳s emissions would decline if more households drove electric vehicles and owned solar panels. In recent years automobile manufacturers have been producing high-performance electric vehicles, and solar panels are becoming more efficient and less expensive. Using several data sets from California, we document evidence of the growth of the joint purchase of electric and hybrid vehicles and solar panels. We discuss pricing and quality trends for these green durable goods.

Suggested Citation

  • Delmas, Magali A. & Kahn, Matthew E. & Locke, Stephen L., 2017. "The private and social consequences of purchasing an electric vehicle and solar panels: Evidence from California," Research in Economics, Elsevier, vol. 71(2), pages 225-235.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:reecon:v:71:y:2017:i:2:p:225-235
    DOI: 10.1016/j.rie.2016.12.002
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Blog mentions

    As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. A Quick Summary of My Published Work in 2017
      by Matthew Kahn in Environmental and Urban Economics on 2017-12-20 19:39:00

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    1. repec:eee:eneeco:v:69:y:2018:i:c:p:196-203 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. repec:eee:energy:v:140:y:2017:i:p1:p:1182-1197 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Quentin Hoarau & Yannick Perez, 2018. "Interactions between electric mobility and photovoltaic generation: a review," Working Papers 1802, Chaire Economie du climat.

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